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Wodgi

Read "Wodgi" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Trumpeter Dave Holdsworth has graced a number of key jazz recordings over the years, notably with Mike Westbrook, Barry Guy and Tony Oxley. At the same time, he recorded rather less than many of his peers from that important period in British jazz in the late '60s/early '70s. Instead of the vagaries of a career in ...

Derek Bailey & Jamie Muir: Dart Drug

Read "Dart Drug" reviewed by Chris May

For decades as rare as hens's teeth--or should that be larks's tongues in aspic?--Dart Drug was originally released on the Incus label in 1981, and reissued on CD in 1994. In 2018 it has been remastered and rereleased on vinyl by Honest Jons.

The bracing yet strangely beautiful album is one of ...

Cecil Taylor

Read "Cecil Taylor" reviewed by John Eyles

On April 5th 2018, the world lost pianist, composer, poet and iconoclast Cecil Taylor, at age 89. Taylor was the last surviving member of a generation of players who gave birth to the music variously labelled as avant-garde, fire music or free jazz, although some sources jointly credit Taylor and Ornette Coleman as its originators.

Gordon Beck: Jubilation! Trios, Quartets and Septets In Session 1964-1984

Read "Jubilation! Trios, Quartets and Septets In Session 1964-1984" reviewed by Roger Farbey

For this 3 CD box set, the estate of Gordon Beck, who died on 6 November 2011 aged 76, granted access to Beck's collection of analogue tapes of live and some studio performances. None of these recordings has ever been previously released. Beck was indubitably one of Britain's finest jazz pianists. He recorded on three key ...

Duo Periculoso: Non é Prohibito

Read "Non é Prohibito" reviewed by Ian Patterson

The collaboration between violinist Gunda Gottschalk and bassist Peter Jacquemyn dates back to 1995, with the duo expanding to a trio in the live arena with the addition of accordionist Ute Völker. Non é Prohibito (el NEGOCITO Records, 2017) is only the duo's second recording and comes eighteen years after E Pericoloso Sporgersi (Valve Records, 1999). ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Thomas Strønen: Sense of Time

Read "Thomas Strønen: Sense of Time" reviewed by Enrico Bettinello

Time Is a Blind Guide, the ensemble led by Norwegian drummer and composer Thomas Stronen, has just released its sophomore record Lucus (ECM), three years after its eponymous debut album. With Ayumi Tanaka on piano, Håkon Aase on violin, Lucy Railton on cello and Ole Morten Vågan on double bass, Strønen has built a chamber-like ensemble ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Il senso del tempo di Thomas Strønen

Read "Il senso del tempo di Thomas Strønen" reviewed by Enrico Bettinello

Dopo l'omonimo disco del 2015, l'ensemble Time Is a Blind Guide guidata dal batterista e compositore norvegese Thomas Stronen pubblica in questi giorni un nuovo, bellissimo, lavoro, Lucus.

Con Strønen troviamo Ayumi Tanaka al pianoforte, Håkon Aase al violino, Lucy Railton al violoncello e Ole Morten Vågan al contrabbasso, un assetto decisamente “cameristico," ...

Marco Bardoscia

Read "Marco Bardoscia" reviewed by Vincenzo Roggero

1. Johann Sebastian Bach, Glenn Gould, Goldberg Variations (Sony Classical, 1981).
La musica di Bach è per me di grande ispirazione e in particolare questa opera monumentale interpretata da Gould. A volte mi capita di ascoltarne degli estratti prima dei concerti.

2. Miles Davis, Relaxin' with the Miles Davis Quintet (Prestige,1958).

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Ian Brighton & Henry Kaiser: Together Apart

Read "Together Apart" reviewed by Roger Farbey

The title of the album explains its realisation; Britain's Ian Brighton and Henry Kaiser from California recorded their respective contributions locally and then Kaiser had them melded seamlessly together. Whilst this methodology is true for nine of the eleven tracks, the first two are solo pieces. “In Memoriam--Jack and Rose Brighton," the longest cut at just ...

Evan Parker

Read "Evan Parker" reviewed by John Eyles

In his biography of Robert Wyatt, Different Every Time (Serpent's Tail, 2015), author Marcus O'Dair describes Evan Parker as “perhaps the finest British free-jazz saxophonist of his generation." The only words in that phrase that seasoned Parker followers might take issue with are “perhaps," “British" and “free-jazz," preferring just to describe him as the finest improvising ...