Content by tag "Cacophony"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Rhythm Kaleidoscope

Read "Rhythm Kaleidoscope" reviewed by Troy Dostert

With a host of wide-ranging work not only as a musician but also as a producer and arranger for television and film projects, Frank Macchia has never been one to rest on his laurels. Even if you're not familiar with his recordings, chances are you've heard at least one of his many film orchestrations: from The ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Grease Mechanix

Read "Grease Mechanix" reviewed by Jack Bowers

One thing that must be said about Frank Macchia (well, two things, actually)--he's a wild and crazy composer / bandleader whose satchel is always overflowing with splendid musical surprises. On his new album, Grease Mechanix, Macchia goes funky in a New Orleans brass band manner, employing a seventeen-piece ensemble comprised of some of the best sidemen ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Frank Macchia's Swamp Thang

Read "Frank Macchia's Swamp Thang" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

You never can tell what some jazz guys have up their sleeves. Los Angeles-based reedman Frank Macchia has worked extensively in television and movies, while maintaining a busy jazz career. His two orchestral jazz outings--Emotions (2006) and Landscapes (2008)--each garnered Grammy nominations, and he has also offered up two very distinctive jazz re-imaginings of traditional fare ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Son Of Folk Songs For Jazzers

Read "Son Of Folk Songs For Jazzers" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Composer/arranger Frank Macchia explores twelve more American folk songs and their reinterpretation through jazz on Son of Folk Songs for Jazzers, a follow-up to his critically acclaimed Folk Songs for Jazzers (Cacophony, 2010), for which he received his third Grammy nod in the Best Instrumental Arrangement category. As with the first album, Macchia uses a fourteen-piece ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Son Of Folk Songs For Jazzers

Read "Son Of Folk Songs For Jazzers" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Saxophonist Frank Macchia keeps racking up the Grammy nominations. He got his third nod for the award with his big band interpretation of “Skip to My Lou," from his Folk Songs for Jazzers (Cacophony, 2010), following up his recognition for Emotions (Cacophony, 2007) and Landscapes (Cacophony 2008).

In addition to his work in producing ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Folk Songs for Jazzers

Read "Folk Songs for Jazzers" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Never the conventionalist when it comes to music, Grammy-nominated composer/arranger and saxophonist Frank Macchia develops another theme album, this time reinterpreting time-honored traditional American folk songs in another innovative frame of jazz on Folk Songs for Jazzers. With a history of releasing concept albums like the saxophone-heavy Saxolollapalooza (Cacophony, 2008), the Third Stream-tinged classical jazz Landscapes(Cacophony, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Folk Songs for Jazzers

Read "Folk Songs for Jazzers" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Frank Macchia seems to have a thing about American folk songs--a very good thing. On his Grammy-nominated Landscapes, the Los Angeles-based multi-reedist/composer/arranger teamed up with The Prague Orchestra and bookended his superb “Landscape Suite" with traditional tunes like “Shenandoah," “Down in the Valley," and “Deep River," with marvelous results.

On Folk Songs for Jazzers, Macchia ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Saxolollapalooza

Read "Saxolollapalooza" reviewed by Jack Bowers

As John Cleese used to say on the Monty Python television series, “And now for something completely different." Of course, one can usually expect something completely different from free-thinking Frank Macchia, and this CD is no exception to the rule. Once upon a time, Macchia writes, he bought a bass saxophone and came up with the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Saxolollapalooza

Read "Saxolollapalooza" reviewed by Jeff Dayton-Johnson

Way in the background on some classic big band recordings, there is a high-pitched aural glow, a sustained, ethereal, almost liturgical hum coming from somewhere in the reeds section. Duke Ellington's “There Shall Be No Night," from the great Blanton/Webster Band box set (Bluebird, 1990), has it. Partly it's the recording technology of the time, sufficiently ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Macchia: Landscapes

Read "Landscapes" reviewed by Michael P. Gladstone

Tenor saxophonist/composer/arranger Frank Macchia has made a significant album that follows-up his Grammy-nominated Emotions (Cacophony, 2006). Again utilizing the strings of the Prague Orchestra under the direction of Adam Klemens, Macchia has submitted another ambitious work to the public.

Listening to Landscapes, the two things that come to mind are film scoring and the ...