Content by tag "Peter Zak"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Andy Fusco: Vortex

Read "Vortex" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Vortex, Andy Fusco's fourth release on the SteepleChase imprint in as many years, is cause for celebration. Until recently, recordings by the veteran alto saxophonist as a leader have been few and far between. The date reunites Fusco with tenor saxophonist Walt Weiskopf, who composed four of the selections and arranged nine of the ten tracks. ...

ARTICLE: BAILEY'S BUNDLES

Ten on Cellar Live

Read "Ten on Cellar Live" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

That crafty Canadian Cory Weeds was onto something with the creation of his Cellar Live and now Cellar Music label. He reveals himself as a man for all seasons in being a confident saxophonist, music historian, and archivist with his new label Reel to Real (in cooperation with that maestro of the catalog, Zev Feldman. With ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Sam Dillon: Out in the Open

Read "Out in the Open" reviewed by Jack Bowers

One thing that must be said for Cory Weeds, the head man at Canada's Cellar Live Records: he knows talent when he sees and hears it. Tenor saxophonist Sam Dillon, who leads an excellent quartet on Out in the Open, his debut recording for Cellar Live, is a case in point. While Dillon is essentially unknown ...

ARTICLE: IN PICTURES

Hard Boppin' at Smalls

Read "Hard Boppin' at Smalls" reviewed by Dave Kaufman

Smalls Jazz Club in Greenwich Village is a remarkably vibrant music venue that enjoys considerable international renown. It is not the most mannered of clubs with loud and boisterous audiences. Nor is it the most decorous, but does offer a rather distinctive look. The club has a great vibe and is committed to treating its audience ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Walt Weiskopf: Fountain Of Youth

Read "Fountain Of Youth" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Fountain Of Youth is the latest installment of Walt Weiskopf's mid-career renaissance. In reviews of Weiskopf's three previous Posi-Tone releases, I made the misstep of treating his imposing skills as a tenor saxophonist, composer, arranger, and bandleader as separate, albeit compatible entities; this time around I realized that they are indeed parts of a larger, all-encompassing ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Walt Weiskopf: All About the Sound

Read "Walt Weiskopf: All About the Sound" reviewed by Bob Kenselaar

What is it that drives Walt Weiskopf? It's all about the music, all about the sound.

He's reached a large audience in ten years of touring with Steely Dan. He's written a half dozen books on jazz improvisation techniques and methods, and he's taught at the Eastman School of Music, Temple University and New ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Walt Weiskopf: The Way You Say It

Read "The Way You Say It" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Do jazz jukeboxes exist? I'm not referring to an online streaming service that tells you what to like. I'm talking about a mechanical box in a roadhouse you put money in, and everyone in the joint listens to your selections. If there are such establishments with said jukeboxes, I'm certain customers would select WW1, WW2, WW3, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Doug Webb: Back East

Read "Back East" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Back East, tenor saxophonist Doug Webb's second 2015 release for the Posi-Tone Records label, is not unlike a thirteen course meal in which every course is sublime, yet the portions are rather small and each dish is cleared quickly, leaving one with an intense desire for more of a particular flavor. Needless to say, there is ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Walt Weiskopf: Open Road

Read "Open Road" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Since 1993, tenor saxophonist Walt Weiskopf has recorded some of the most advanced and satisfying music of the jazz genre. All told he claims over fifteen albums as a leader, with original compositions forming the core material of each and every one of his releases. The fact that he is not better known among the jazz ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Walt Weiskopf: Open Road

Read "Open Road" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

It all starts with the sound of Walt Weiskopf's tenor saxophone. Large, keening, expansive, his tone sometimes threatens to explode and wreak havoc on everything it touches. During lyrical passages and on ballads, he scales the sound back a little, waxing sensitive, tender, even poetic, but not abandoning its core--the moderation usually doesn't last very long. ...