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ARTICLE: JAZZ JOURNAL

Autumn 2017

Read "Autumn 2017" reviewed by Doug Collette

Jazz Journal is a regular column consisting of pithy takes on recent jazz releases of note as well as spotlights on those titles in the genre that might otherwise go unnoticed under the cultural radar.

Jim Yanda Trio
Regional Cookin'
Corner Store Jazz
2017

There's an uncanny similarity ...

Organissimo: B3tles: A Soulful Tribute To The Fab Four

Read "B3tles: A Soulful Tribute To The Fab Four" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

When one thinks of jazz cities responsible for contributing some of the music's most important artists, Detroit is always a name that pops up at the top of the list. A short list of icons who hail from the city would have to include Ron Carter, the Jones Brothers, James Carter, Pepper Adams, Louis Hayes, and ...

Organissimo: B3tles: A Soulful Tribute To The Fab Four

Read "B3tles: A Soulful Tribute To The Fab Four" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Guitarist Grant Green was one of the early birds on this: turning Beatles tunes into soulful jazz workouts, with his I Want to Hold Your Hand (Blue Note, 1965), featuring Hammond organ master Larry Young on the B3, recorded a little over a year after the Fab Four's musical invasion of America. But it was mostly ...

Greg Nagy: Stranded

Read "Stranded" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

First, of course, is the voice. Tonally-even voices are boring. That explains the appeal of voices like Louis Armstrong's (pitch-perfect gravel in a coffee can); Richard Manuel's (pleading voice of a dying man); Levon Helm's (Scotch-Irish Delta dirt) and Neil Young's (dry ice on the range). Greg Nagy has a voice like that. It is beautifully ...

Gene Ludwig: Love Notes of Cole Porter

Read "Love Notes of Cole Porter" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

The Hammond B3 organ combo has always seemed like a working man's jazz group. Drums/guitar/organ groups, often with a saxophone, was a brand of music brought to popularity in the mid-fifties by Jimmy Smith, with interest in the B3 soul jazz sound exploding in the sixties with the work of Jimmy McGriff and Jack McDuff, and ...

Gene Ludwig: Love Notes Of Cole Porter

Read "Love Notes Of Cole Porter" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

The release of Gene Ludwig's Love Notes Of Cole Porter is a bittersweet event. While this collection of music shines a spotlight on one of the great, under-recognized organ talents in the world of jazz, it also marks the final recording from this mainstay of the Pittsburgh jazz scene. Ludwig passed away suddenly in the summer ...

Gene Ludwig: Love Notes Of Cole Porter

Read "Gene Ludwig: Love Notes Of Cole Porter" reviewed by Justin Vargo

Gene Ludwig

Love Notes Of Cole Porter

Big O Records

2011

Nearly two years prior to his untimely death in July of 2010, Pittsburgh organist Gene Ludwig recorded this tribute to composer Cole Porter. Thanks to the efforts of Ludwig's wife and the folks at Big O Records, Ludwig's final ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Organissimo: Alive & Kickin'

Read "Alive & Kickin'" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

The title of Organissimo's first live recording, Alive & Kickin', is a great description of how a guitar/organ trio live record should sound. Just about everything on this set comes homegrown by this Michigan trio: organ player Jim Alfredson met guitarist Joe Gloss in a Michigan State University (MSU) jazz class; the duo eventually became a ...

Greg Nagy: Walk that Fine Thin Line

Read "Walk that Fine Thin Line" reviewed by Clifford Allen

It's not necessarily obvious to think of Michigan's “thumb" as being a hotbed of blues music. Sure, Detroit has produced a large share of jazz, R&B and Doo-Wop groups, and the state was home to the frantic blues-fueled rock of the Stooges and the MC5, but despite its proximity to Chicago, Michigan's lower third doesn't exude ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

organissimo: Groovadelphia

Read "Groovadelphia" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

For a testament to what a trio can accomplish when they spend years working together, look no farther than organissimo. Over the course of nearly a decade, organist Jim Alfredson, guitarist Joe Gloss and drummer Randy Marsh have developed strong group instincts and a knowing way of approaching every groove. As a result, Groovadelphia can keep ...