All About Jazz

Home » Tag Center » Tag: Brett Sroka

Content by tag "Brett Sroka"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: As subtle as tomorrow

Read "As subtle as tomorrow" reviewed by Vic Albani



Ritengo la Cuneiform una delle migliori e intelligenti etichette musicali esistenti poiché, lavorando su territori spesso assai diversi fra loro, riesce regolarmente a evidenziare new forms e ricerche di spessore in molti lavori di artisti celebrati o meno. È il caso di questi Ergo (che hanno anche un sito che si chiama “ergo ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: If Not Inertia

Read "If Not Inertia" reviewed by AAJ Italy Staff

Il terzo disco del gruppo Ergo si muove sul piano di una musica intensa e pensata secondo linee geometriche, incentrate su una grande attenzione al suono. Si capisce sin dal pezzo di apertura, che cresce lungo un asse sommatorio dominato da una sola nota ossessiva, su cui si aggiunge uno strumento alla volta, o quando i suoni ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: If Not Inertia

Read "If Not Inertia" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

A few decades ago, it wasn't evident that computers could become an integral component to music, other than some experimental persuasions set forth by the likes of eminent modern jazz trombonist George Lewis, who helped pioneer live electronics. But trombonist Brett Sroka carries the torch, yet in a different or, perhaps, more subtle light. With first-call ...

May 2010

Read "May 2010" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Adam Lane

Brooklyn Lyceum

Brooklyn, NY April 14, 2010

While bassist Adam Lane's Full Throttle Orchestra is named to conjure up great size and bombast, at present it's a compact sextet whose sonic inventory includes passages of nuance and overall calm. With a Bay Area lineup, Lane has released No(w) Music (Cadence, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: Multitude, Solitude

Read "Multitude, Solitude" reviewed by Elliott Simon

During the past two decades, electronic music has solidified its initial uneasy alliance with acoustic jazz. Newer releases such as Ergo's Multitude, Solitude are able to get past that original awkward balance and meld electronics with jazz improvisation and instrumental technique. The result is a trio that interacts like one but also accesses the broader sound ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: Multitude, Solitude

Read "Multitude, Solitude" reviewed by AAJ Italy Staff

Nell'immagine in bianco e nero che troviamo stampata sotto al contenitore plastico del CD, campeggia una cuffia appoggiata sopra al rullante di una batteria. Un segnale preciso di come si debba entrare in questo universo musicale in punta di piedi e soprattutto in silenzio. Il trio denominato 'Ergo' parte già con una formazione inconsueta: trombone, tastiere e batteria. Una singolarità che non ricordiamo ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: Multitude, Solitude

Read "Multitude, Solitude" reviewed by Nic Jones

This is a trio working the electro-acoustic margins, as the instrumental line-up might suggest; and whilst Ergo's music often flirts with ambient notions, there is equally a predominant air of unease about their work, as if by mutual consent they can only reach a kind of uneasy rapprochement with both silence and the moment.

The air ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: Multitude, Solitude

Read "Multitude, Solitude" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Keyboardist Carl Maguire is a multifaceted artiste, often-heralded for his work in various jazz-related formats for Between The Lines, MoonJune Records and other progressive record labels. On this trio's second CD, Maguire, trombonist/computer operator Brett Sroka and drummer Shawn Baltazor spawn an experimental muse, where rigid definitions or categorizations, justifiably fall flat. Essentially, the respective artists ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ergo: Multitude, Solitude

Read "Multitude, Solitude" reviewed by John Kelman

As jazz leans away from characteristics that so defined its earliest days, groups are emerging with unorthodox instrumental combinations, fleshed out by the vast potential of technological soundscaping. Ergo, at its core, seems as unconventional as they get--trombone, keyboards, drums--creating music that wouldn't have been possible before relatively recent innovations in sound processing and sampling/looping. Its ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Brett Sroka: Hearsay

Read "Hearsay" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Brett Sroka's trombone moans in alone; the trumpet follows, then the tenor sax. The rhythm section sneaks in there on the sly, and the opener, Duke Ellington's “Hearsay" (from The Deep South Suite), churns into a rumbling, channeled cacophony of Jazz--capitol 'J'.

This is trombonist Brett Sroka's debut, and it bears out liner notes author ...