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Moskus: Salmesykkel

Read "Moskus: Salmesykkel" reviewed by John Kelman

For a country isolated in the north of Europe, Norway has experienced a surprising number of musical waves. The first came in the early '70s, when producer Manfred Eicher and his fledgling ECM Records label brought the Scandinavian “big five"--Swedish pianist Bobo Stenson and, from Norway, saxophonist Jan Garbarek, guitarist Terje Rypdal, bassist Arild Andersen and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Neneh Cherry & The Thing: The Cherry Thing

Read "The Cherry Thing" reviewed by Mark Corroto

The Scandinavian power trio of saxophonist Mats Gustafsson, bassist Ingebrigt Håker Flaten and drummer Paal Nilssen-Love named their band The Thing in 2000, after the Don Cherry composition from Where's Brooklyn (Blue Note, 1966). In their subsequent dozen or so albums, they have covered Cherry's music and that of Albert Ayler, Joe McPhee, and Duke Ellington. ...

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Arp: The Soft Wave

Read "The Soft Wave" reviewed by John Kelman

In a time of home studios and digital media, the resurgence of interest in all things analogue has transcended simple nostalgia. To be sure, better analogue-to-digital conversions have improved almost exponentially over the early days of digital recording, to the point where most people can't tell the difference. Similarly, though digital sampling and synthesis has, in ...

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Nisennenmondai: Destination Tokyo

Read "Destination Tokyo" reviewed by AAJ Italy Staff

Se dovessimo aggiungere qualche tag all'immagine delle giapponesi Nisennenmondai [tre giovani fanciulle che si spartiscono i canonici chitarra-basso-batteria] che emerge da questo Destination Tokyo [che segue in occidente la pubblicazione dei due Ep Neji/Tori] potremmo certamente annotare le parole chiave: krautrock, ipnosi, ripetizione, nevrosi. Tutto molto nipponico, anche se con chiare basi e influenze euro-americane [quindi tutto molto nipponico, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Mungolian Jet Set: We Gave It All Away...Now We Are Taking It Back

Read "We Gave It All Away...Now We Are Taking It Back" reviewed by John Kelman

Living in an alternate universe, where groove is paramount regardless of where it finds its inspiration, Mungolian Jet Set's debut, Beauty Came to Us in Stone (Jazzland, 2006), found its primary members--turntablist/sonic manipulator DJ Strangefruit, known in this dimension as Pål Nyhus, of Nu-Jazz progenitor/trumpeter Nils Petter Molvær's group until recently, and sound sculptor Reider Skar--creating ...

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Meanderthals: Desire Lines

Read "Desire Lines" reviewed by John Kelman

While music of the dance floor is often mistakenly considered as lacking in substance--great beats, but nothing more--electronica artists and even cross-pollinating jazzers like Nils Petter Molvær, Bugge Wesseltoft, and Eivind Aarset are proving that it's possible to make music equally engaging for the mind and body. Certainly Wesseltoft's New Conception of Jazz Box (Jazzland, 2009) ...

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Original Silence: The Second Original Silence

Read "The Second Original Silence" reviewed by Andrey Henkin

There a certain amount of irony in calling a group Original Silence that brings together members of The Thing, Sonic Youth, ZU and The Ex. Mats Gustafsson (baritone sax, live electronics), Thurston Moore (guitar), Jim O'Rourke (electronica), Terrie X (guitar), Massimo Pupillo (electric bass) and Paal Nilssen-Love (drums) threaten the sound barrier just by being in ...

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Lars Horntveth: Kaleidoscopic

Read "Kaleidoscopic" reviewed by John Kelman

As a younger demographic increasingly accepts cross-pollination and challenges simple stylistic categorization, there's an increasing number of artists for whom defying boundaries has long since transcended conscious consideration and become, instead, an organic and completely natural modus operandi. Norway's Jaga Jazzist both regularly and successfully disregarded narrow confines and became, instead, something no longer resembling any ...

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Joe McPhee: Tomorrow Came Today

Read "Tomorrow Came Today" reviewed by Lyn Horton

Music and talking are two modes of expression rooted in human communication. Most of the time, the audible distinction is clear. Sounds are sounds and words are words: the medium makes no difference in how one hears the instrumentality of either. In the context of improvisation, reed player Joe McPhee and drummer Paal Nilssen-Love challenge the ...

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Sunburned Hand of the Man: Fire Escape

Read "Fire Escape" reviewed by Joshua Weiner

Sunburned Hand of the Man is a loose collective of experimental musicians, centered around drummer John Moloney and bassist Robert Thomas, who have been hailed as leaders of the “new weird movement. Fire Escape treads the group's usual ground, harkening back to exploratory heavyweights of the 1970s such as Can, Popul Vuh and even the Grateful ...