Content by tag "Sketch"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Mal Waldron: One More Time

Read "One More Time" reviewed by Mike Neely



One More Time is an intimate portrait of two neglected masters with a third master, Steve Lacy, stepping in to add his low-key tip of the hat. Mal Waldron and Jean-Jacques Avenel are the focus of this release that serves as a tribute to Waldron, one of jazz's most versatile pianists who died in ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Bill Carrothers: Armistice 1918

Read "Armistice 1918" reviewed by Chris May

As we approach the hundredth anniversary of the start of “the war to end all wars," international conflict blights the planet like never before, and unilateral might-is-right aggression is increasingly replacing diplomacy and consensus. Bad karma rules and history sometimes seems, like the poet said, to be “one fucking thing after another."

So Bill ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Yaron Herman/Sylvain Ghio: Takes 2 to Know 1

Read "Takes 2 to Know 1" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Though the piano/drums duo format is not unprecedented (Russ Freeman and Shelly Manne were doing it back in the early '50s), the Sean Lennon look-alike, Israeli-residing-in-Paris pianist Yaron Herman avoids the seemingly inevitable avant-garde tendencies that this experimental pairing has conveniently evolved into over the decades.

A very thematic player who remains conscious of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Bill Carrothers: Armistice 1918

Read "Armistice 1918" reviewed by John Kelman

It has been written that if pianist Bill Carrothers hadn't found his way to music, he'd have likely become a historian, something that is clear from an earlier record, The Blues and the Greys , and now even more so with his new release, Armistice 1918 , an ambitious two-CD set which, over the course of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Edouard Ferlet: Par Tous Les Temps

Read "Par Tous Les Temps" reviewed by John Kelman

Edouard Ferlet is a young French pianist who has been making a name for himself in Europe with his own projects and, most notably, with two recordings for bassist Jean-Philippe Viret’s trio. Etant Donnes and Considerations , both released on Philippe Ghielmetti’s progressive Sketch Music label, established Ferlet as a new artist on the scene with ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Mirabassi/Boltro/Ferris: (((AIR)))

Read "(((AIR)))" reviewed by John Kelman

When one thinks of chamber jazz, one hardly thinks of an ensemble consisting of piano, trumpet and trombone. This should not be such a foreign ide,a though, since the three instruments represent a broad range, both harmonically and texturally. And the trombone, at one time considered more of an ensemble instrument, is taking its rightful place ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Humair: Baby Boom

Read "Baby Boom" reviewed by John Kelman

Trust drummer Daniel Humair, who has had more musical lives than the proverbial cat, to continue to reinvent himself by surrounding himself with a group of young players who are equally at home with both composed and free styles of music. Baby Boom unites Humair with saxophonists Matthieu Donarier and Christophe Monniot, bassist Sebastien Boisseau and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Marc Ducret: Qui Parle?

Read "Qui Parle?" reviewed by John Kelman

Now in his late forties, guitarist Marc Ducret has built a career out of taking the essence of various traditions and turning them on their side. With Qui Parle? Ducret has fashioned perhaps his most ambitious and audacious effort to date, a seventy-five minute suite that is bold and almost entirely indefinable in terms of how ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Marc Copland/Gary Peacock: What It Says

Read "What It Says" reviewed by John Kelman

With a brooding approach that is nonetheless elegant in its delicacy, pianist Marc Copland teams up for yet another series of outstanding duets, this time with double-bassist Gary Peacock. What It Says represents some of Copland's most impressionistically abstract work and, for Peacock, his most successful duet outing this side of his work with Ralph Towner. ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Marc Ducret: Qui Parle?

Read "Qui Parle?" reviewed by Phil DiPietro

While he's turned in some brilliant interim work , it's been four years since Marc Ducret's last solo project. Now 46, Ducret worked more than two years on Qui parle? (which translates to “Who's speaking?"), wherein his conceptual thrust begins to overtake his colossal aptitude as a pure player. With the members of his working trio ...