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NEWS: VIDEO / DVD

Ana Mazzotti: Sao Paulo Sound

Ana Mazzotti: Sao Paulo Sound

Brazil in the 1974 was a country of joy and pain. The military had taken control in a coup 10 years earlier and would rule with harsh anti-communist rule until 1985. Strangely, the dictatorship reached the height of its popularity in the 1970s with sizable economic growth known as the “Brazilian Miracle." But prosperity came with ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ivan Conti: Poison Fruit

Read "Poison Fruit" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

If the music on his fourth solo album Poison Fruit is a true indicator, Ivan “Mamão" Conti hasn't lost his uncanny producer's ear or instrumentalist's touch for clubbers or dancers in Brazil. A legendary bandleader, percussion and drum player, and composer, Mamão sweetens Poison Fruit by letting it ripen in the hands of two younger, next ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Eumir Deodato: Os Catedraticos 73

Read "Os Catedraticos 73" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Composer/arranger/keyboardist Eumir Deodato is best known for a series of albums on the CTI label, notably Prelude (CTI Records, 1973) and Deodato 2 (CTI Records, 1973). Os Catedraticos 73 dates from the same period, and employs many of the same musicians. It was recorded between Rio de Janeiro and New York, featuring a Brazilian rhythm section ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Amaro Freitas: Rasif

Read "Rasif" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

In the small coastal city of Recife, in the Brazilian state of Pernambuco, Amaro Freitas began playing piano in his local church at age 12. A few years later, the jazz gods intervened in the form of a Chick Corea concert DVD. “He completely blew my mind," Freitas once recalled. “I'd never seen anything like it ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Amaro Freitas: Rasif

Read "Rasif" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Brazilian pianist/composer Amaro Freitas is from the coastal city of Recife in the northeastern state of Pernambuco. His geographic background is important, because he has been heavily influenced by the Afro-Brazilian maracatu (dating from slavery days) and the high intensity carnival rhythms of frevo and baião, as well as the jazz tradition. Most of this album ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Emilio Santiago: Emilio Santiago

Read "Emilio Santiago" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

In 1975, vocalist Emilio Santiago was riding high as “The Nat King Cole of Brazil" and recording this eponymous full-length debut with some of that verdant musical nation's leading jazz composers and instrumentalists, including João Donato (keyboards), Danilo Caymmi (flute), Wilson das Neves (drums) and Victor Assis Brasil (saxophone). The four decades which have since passed ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Emilio Santiago: Emilio Santiago

Read "Emilio Santiago" reviewed by Kevin Press

In retrospect, it's not surprising that Emílio Santiago chose a track list steeped in Latin music history and a long list of some of the best players in the game. It was clear from early on that Santiago had the potential to make a significant contribution to the genre. What's remarkable about this 1975 debut--reissued by ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Hugo Fattoruso: Hugo Fattoruso Y Barrio Opa

Read "Hugo Fattoruso Y Barrio Opa" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

Once upon a time in Uruguay, teenage brothers Osvaldo and Hugo Fattoruso stepped out of their musical family trio to play guitar and bass for popular Latin American jazz (swing) and rock 'n' roll ensembles, venturing in and around the region and woodshedding, which gave them time and space to work candombe rhythms and bossa nova ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Sean Khan: Palmares Fantasy

Read "Palmares Fantasy" reviewed by Chris May

Palmares Fantasy is the fifth album to be released by British saxophonist Sean Khan under his own name or as the leader of SK Radicals. Like its predecessors, it is a blinder, in touch with the jazz tradition while absorbing influences from beyond it and wearing its political heart on its sleeve. The music is characteristic ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Victor Assis Brasil: Esperanto/Toca Antonio Carlos Jobim

Read "Esperanto/Toca Antonio Carlos Jobim" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

By the summer of 1970, popular music's lunatic joyride through the 1960s had fully careened into the new decade. Almost anything and everything still seemed possible. That summer, saxophonist Victor Assis Brasil returned to his home in Brazil from studies (alongside Dizzy Gillespie, Chick Corea, Ron Carter, and others) at the Berklee College of Music to ...