Content by tag "Jazz Halo"

Gilbert Isbin Group: Water With A Smile

Read "Water With A Smile" reviewed by Mark Sabbatini

Belgian guitarist Gilbert Isban is a formidable nylon finger-picking veteran on everything from classical to avant-garde. He makes his debut as a composer and arranger on his 13th album--and in this case, that proves to be a lucky number.



Water With A Smile is another of those albums purporting the equation Latin + world ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Vinny Golia Quintet: One, Three, Two

Read "One, Three, Two" reviewed by John Kelman

Sometimes adversity can engender the most remarkable responses. Woodwind multi-instrumentalist Vinny Golia and his quintet had landed in Belgium the morning of September 11th, 2001, having taken off from New York a few hours before the terrible tragedy of the World Trade Center/Pentagon attacks, only then to discover what had happened. When the promoters gave the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joe Fonda & Gilbert Isbin: Blisters

Read "Blisters" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

Joe Fonda and Gilbert Isbin, partners in time, create vivid imagery via the many manifestations of sound they take their instruments through, over, and across. What is more remarkable is that they do it with an astute aesthetic: there is no howl or cry in their music. What they have is rhythm, a pulse and a ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Michael Jefry Stevens: The Survivor's Suite

Read "The Survivor's Suite" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

Michael Jefry Stevens is a fluid player who finds his comfort level not only on the cool side but also through free jazz and instant improvisation. His touch is both delicate and hard hitting, stopping short of bombast when he ventures into the latter. The balance is visible on this solo record not only in his ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The December Thirty Jazz Trio: Free For 3

Read "Free For 3" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

It is said that time and tide wait for no man. Time, however, has waited for this piano trio. The group's first recording, The Street One Year After, was released in 1991. Since then they have released two more, both in the last decade. As for the tide, it still roars in their favor. The brand ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The December Thirty Jazz Trio: Free For 3

Read "Free For 3" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

It is said that time and tide wait for no man. Time, however, has waited for this trio. Their first recording, The Street One Year After, was released in 1991. Since then they have released two more, both in the last decade. And now, here they are again with one more. As for the tide, it ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chris Joris: Songs For Mbizo

Read "Songs For Mbizo" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Belgian pianist/percussionist Chris Joris recorded these sessions with tubaist Bob Stewart and South African bassist Johnny (Mbizo) Dyani back in 1976. Sadly, Dyani passed away in 1988, while additional tracks emanating from 1991 sessions featuring Stewart and a conglomerate of European artists round out this effort.

Joris' knowledge and implementations of wide ranging rhythmic ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joe Fonda: When It's Time

Read "When It's Time" reviewed by Michael A. Parker

It would be a mistake to try and situate this record in a continuum of solo bass works that have been created in the past 30 years, starting with Barre Philips and Motoharu Yoshizawa's work in the late 60's.

Joe Fonda is not on some kind of mission to redefine the bass and its role ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ben Sluijs & Erik Vermeulen: Stones

Read "Stones" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

The Belgium-based, 'Jazz Halo' modern jazz label was founded five years ago and has already amassed a noteworthy catalogue, featuring respected artists such as bassist, Joelle Leandre and saxophonist, Oliver Lake while also highlighting the abilities of Belgian jazz musicians. Such is the case with this new release titled, Stones, which is a short story (included ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joelle Leandre & Ryoji Hojito: Sapporo Duets

Read "Sapporo Duets" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Here, Ms. Joelle Leandre displays her consummate artistry alongside the very impressive pianist, Ryoji Hojito for a series of somewhat playful duets, featuring the artists' verbose musical dialogue and ornate textures. Through it all, the duo institutes an abundance of sub plots as Ms Leandre's resonantly wooden tone provides radiant contrast to the pianist's percussive block ...