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ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Not Two...But Twenty! Festival

Read "Not Two...But Twenty! Festival" reviewed by John Sharpe

Not Two...But Twenty! Festival
Wlen, Poland
September 21-23, 2018

Intro There are some things worth celebrating in style, one of them being marked persistence in the face of adversity. That pretty much describes the continued existence of any jazz record label in these straitened times. To mark its 20th ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

A Musical Portrait of Ken Vandermark

Read "A Musical Portrait of Ken Vandermark" reviewed by Centro d'Arte Padova

For our second contribution to All About Jazz's Mixcloud column, we introduce a mixtape series that we've curated since 2016, entitled “50/50." Through these selections we aim to present a comprehensive overview of the artists invited to play at Centro d'Arte through a mix of their music, curated by us, and of music that inspires them, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Dave Rempis: Lattice

Read "Lattice" reviewed by John Sharpe

Since the AACM pioneered solo instrumental performance it has become a rite of passage for most creative musicians. In some ways the surprise is that saxophonist Dave Rempis, as one of the most fluent improvisers of his generation, has waited until now to record his first unaccompanied recital. That he rises to the challenge should be ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chicago Reed Quartet: Western Automatic

Read "Western Automatic" reviewed by John Sharpe

After a heyday in the late 1970s which saw the World Saxophone Quartet, ROVA and the 29th Street Saxophone Quartet, to list but three of the more celebrated, strutting their stuff, the format has undergone a hiatus more recently. However it remains firmly established as an instrumental configuration and perhaps the only surprise is that it ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Rempis Percussion Quartet: Cash And Carry

Read "Cash And Carry" reviewed by John Sharpe

Ornette Coleman was one of the first to use two drummers in a smaller ensemble for his seminal double quartet Free Jazz (Atlantic, 1961). In doing so they established the template for dual interaction, as Ed Blackwell majored on drum patterns while Billy Higgins emphasized the cymbals. While the format has become much more widespread as ...

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio + Jeb Bishop: The Flame Alphabet

Read "The Flame Alphabet" reviewed by Eyal Hareuveni

The collaboration between the prolific Portuguese saxophonist Rodrigo Amado and his Motion Trio with Chicagoan trombonist Jeb Bishop, has produced two albums so far. The live recording, Burning Live At Jazz AO Centro (JACC Records, 2012) and the 2011 studio recording The Flame Alphabet. The addition of Bishop to Amado's trio was organic. Both are experienced ...

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Barry Guy New Orchestra: Krakow, Poland, November 20-23, 2012

Read "Barry Guy New Orchestra: Krakow, Poland, November 20-23, 2012" reviewed by John Sharpe

Barry Guy New Orchestra
Alchemia
Krakow, Poland
November 20-23, 2012

Now in its seventh year, the annual autumn jazz extravaganza--Krakowska Jesien Jazzowa, in the beautiful Polish city of Krakow--has gone from strength to strength. It's impossible to see all the acts on the bill without spending several months in residence as they come in ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Rodrigo Amado: Burning Live At Jazz AO Centro

Read "Burning Live At Jazz AO Centro" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Rodrigo Amado's improvising Motion Trio might be better described as The Confluence Trio or Conflux, because its sound is a meeting of rivers. Like the three rivers of Pittsburgh, where the Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers join to create the Ohio River, or Sangam, India where the Ganges, Yamuna and Saraswati meet, the music of the Motion ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ballister Trio: Mechanisms

Read "Mechanisms" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Stop me if you've heard this one before. A free improvising trio walks into a club and begins a live performance by ripping the ears off its listeners. No joke here, just that flexing muscular music isn't for the faint-at-heart. And certainly the trio of saxophonist Dave Rempis, cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm and drummer Paal Nilssen-Love is ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Je Suis!: Mistluren

Read "Mistluren" reviewed by Mark Corroto

In 1962 free jazz pioneer Albert Ayler moved to Sweden. Like Jesus Christ's 40 days in the desert, he came home to the United States after being tempted by the devil, and led a revolution in free jazz. His Swedish temptation, perhaps it was a viral contagion, has survived these past 50 years, resurfacing in the ...