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ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

The Branford Marsalis Quartet at Jazz Standard

Read "The Branford Marsalis Quartet at Jazz Standard" reviewed by Peter Jurew

Branford Marsalis Quartet
Jazz Standard
New York, NY
February 20, 2019

The Branford Marsalis Quartet came into jny: New York's Jazz Standard in late February to showcase The Secret Between The Shadow And The Soul, their first new album release in seven years and, in marking the special ...

ARTICLE: CATCHING UP WITH

Rina Yamazaki: Conversations with a Rising Star

Read "Rina Yamazaki:  Conversations with a Rising Star" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

Born in Japan, up and coming pianist Rina Yamazaki has lived in in the USA since she was accepted at Boston's prestigious Berklee College of Music on a full scholarship in 2015. Both before moving to the US and after Yamazaki has earned a number of well-deserved accolades for her high-level musicianship. From receiving the Jazz ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Benjamin Boone & Philip Levine: The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two

Read "The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Poetry and music are overlapping forms of expression. Poetry emphasizes the musicality of words. Music has many features of poetry including sound, syntax, and meaning. Still, only a few poets have spoken their poems in a musical context. It is hard to do effectively because speech and music have different functions: speech is about things, intentions, ...

ARTICLE: YEAR IN REVIEW

2018: The Year in Jazz

Read "2018: The Year in Jazz" reviewed by Ken Franckling

The year 2018 was a busy one for the jazz world. The genre's version of the #MeToo movement resulted in a new Code of Conduct and other efforts to make the music workplace more equitable. International Jazz Day brought its biggest stage to St. Petersburg, Russia. The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, which ran a high-profile ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Ward Presents Rogue Parade: Stomping Off From Greenwood

Read "Stomping Off From Greenwood" reviewed by Gareth Thompson

After a stint in New York, saxophonist Greg Ward was lured home to Chicago in 2016 by a project based on Charles Mingus's The Black Saint And The Sinner Lady (Impulse! Records, 1963). Ward's new vision of this record was widely acclaimed, not least for its performance with a ballet company, as Mingus had desired.

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Allison Au Quartet: Wander Wonder

Read "Wander Wonder" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Toronto-based, Juno Award-winning alto saxophonist Allison Au and her quartet present their follow-up to 2017's Forest Grove (Self Produced) with Wander Wonder. The set of all Au originals--with keyboardist Todd Pentney co-writing “Force Majeur"--opens with a translucent dreamscape, “The Valley," that sounds like something that Daniel Lanois might have cooked up. The quartet follows up this ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Joe Locke, Branford Marsalis and More

Read "Joe Locke, Branford Marsalis and More" reviewed by Joe Dimino

We start this week's episode with one of the finest voices on the vibes who made his way through Kansas City in early December, Joe Locke, with a cut off his new CD Subtle Disguise. From there, we dive headlong into the music of a legend on the drums in Billy Cobham, who was the subject ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Rain Sultanov: Putting Baku On The Jazz Map

Read "Rain Sultanov: Putting Baku On The Jazz Map" reviewed by Ian Patterson

The Baku Jazz Festival has been a labor of love for its founder and Artistic Director, Rain Sultanov. And, like most love stories, there have been a few bumps along the road. Thirteen editions in, however, the Baku Jazz Festival is well established as one of the highpoints of Azerbaijan's annual cultural calendar. It mightn't draw ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Benjamin Boone: The Poetry of Jazz

Read "The Poetry of Jazz" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Lenny Bruce might have skewered it with his skit, “Psychopathia Sexualis." Mike Myers' mildly misogynist poet might have parodied it in the movie I Married an Axe Murderer (1993). It has been dismissed as a late-fifties fad associated with the Beats. And, yet, the desire of poets and jazz musicians to combine their art forms has ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Bruno Raberg: Tailwind

Read "Tailwind" reviewed by Gareth Thompson

In a 2005 interview, double bassist Bruno Råberg discussed how Scandinavian music reflects the country's vast mountains and forests. “You can see very far and that calmness and meditative spirituality comes through," he says. Born in Sweden, but a longtime resident of Boston, you sense Råberg still carries his homeland close to the heart.