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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Andy Snitzer: Traveler

Read "Traveler" reviewed by Jeff Winbush

Even without uttering a single word, music can convey many moods, and Traveler, Andy Snitzer's first album in a decade, finds the saxophonist in a reflective mood. The degree of restraint and reserve in Snitzer's playing runs counter to many of his contemporaries, where loud and long soloing is standard operating procedure.

If overplaying can ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

East West Quintet: Vast

Read "Vast" reviewed by Lyn Horton

Apparent in the Brooklyn-based East West Quintet's Vast is the way the music teeters between colors, tunes, dynamics, rhythms and abstractions. Varying degrees of crescendos and decrescendos transform the mixtures of melodic temperament from peaceful to anthem-like, from quickly paced to mellifluously slow. That the band members play a multiplicity of different instruments is crucial; they ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

East West Quintet: Vast

Read "Vast" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Enthusiastic youth coupled with solid musicianship and strong compositions offer the winning edge by this Brooklyn, New York-based ensemble that started in 2003 as a bop unit inspired by Cannonball Adderley. Time marches on and now this quintet delves into that opaque line that teeters between jazz-rock and jazz-fusion. Recorded to two-inch tape, the band projects ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Josh Nelson: Let It Go

Read "Let It Go" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

A man is standing in the middle of the city while the traffic passes by. Eyes half closed. Tie blowing in the air. Later there's a change of scene. The man is now inside an apartment and he is standing in front of a window. Eyes totally closed.



The man is the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Andy Snitzer: Some Quiet Place

Read "Some Quiet Place" reviewed by Jeff Winbush

The art of listening to music depends as much upon when you listen to it as what type of music you hear. Sitting in a church while the choir sings is probably not the best time to expect to hear Metallica's “Enter Sandman" or Gwen Stefani's “Hollaback Girl," to name two examples from popular music. However, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Adam Niewood: Introducing Adam Niewood

Read "Introducing Adam Niewood" reviewed by Mark F. Turner

Though Adam Niewood's 2004 debut recording may have been late in coming, it showcases the immense voice of this little-known but rising musician. The New York saxophonist is the son of musical parents, jazz saxophonist Gerry Niewood and classical pianist Gurly Niewood. But he may be better known for his expertise as a woodwind mouthpiece refinisher, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Turning Point: Matador

Read "Matador" reviewed by Woodrow Wilkins

Turning Point is a small group with a big sound. By throwing in a little funk, a little salsa, and lots of sizzle on Matador, this quartet, assisted by two guest musicians, blends a variety of cultures in creating its own brand of rock-jazz.

One of the nice things about a group like this is that ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Sara Gazarek: Yours

Read "Yours" reviewed by Woodrow Wilkins

It's commonplace for young vocalists to do an album of standards when debuting on the jazz scene. What sets them apart is how they present these songs, which have been done many times over by both veterans and newcomers. Some who have succeeded are Jane Monheit, Michael Bublé, and Renee Olstead. Sara Gazarek, 23, has joined ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Turning Point: Matador

Read "Matador" reviewed by John Kelman

While smooth jazz has evolved into a kind of horrifying “S word for a lot of jazz fans, it grew out of a kind of contemporary post-fusion sensibility that, at least in its earliest days, still valued strong playing and enough diversity to keep things interesting. Matador--Phoenix-based Turning Point's sixth release and first for the Native ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Jeff Kashiwa: Peace Of Mind

Read "Peace Of Mind" reviewed by Mark Sabbatini

Somebody's missing the point here. I'm almost hoping it's me.



There's clearly a decent market for albums like Peace Of Mind, the fifth solo album by former Rippingtons saxophonist Jeff Kashiwa, since so many of these smooth jazz soundalikes are occupying bin space at music stores. And a small part of me was rooting ...