Content by tag "Imogena"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Sandviken Big Band: In the Name of Freedom

Read "In the Name of Freedom" reviewed by Jack Bowers

This admirably performed two-CD set by Sweden's celebrated Sandviken Big Band, recorded live in 2009 and comprised for the most part of music composed by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn, isn't without its ambiguous aspects. First, there's the title: while anyone who produces an album is free to assign any name that seems appropriate, In the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Emma Larsson: Let It Go

Read "Let It Go" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Among the many sub-genres of jazz, none is more congested than that of female vocalists. So clotted is this particular marketplace that it is almost impossible to separate the signal (exceptional releases) from the noise (everything else). There are precious few ways for an artist to set herself apart from the merely good vocalists as a ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Svend Asmussen: Fiddling Around

Read "Fiddling Around" reviewed by Chris Mosey

While striving to avoid clichés like the plague, there seems only one way to describe Danish jazz violinist Svend Asmussen: he is still going strong. At the age of 92, “the fiddling Viking" is embarking on a 2008 tour of Scandinavia. Fiddling Around, recorded when he was a mere slip of a lad, age 77, has ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Sounds Of Eternity: Part One

Read "Part One" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

The title of this album projects existential or perhaps biblical connotations. Yet this Swedish quintet evens out the glorious melodies with a contemporary jazz methodology, topped-off with a distinct edge. They render a balancing act of sorts, where improvisation attains a hearty coexistence with Linnea Olsson's angelic vocals and textural cello work to complement an easy ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Fredrik Lindborg: The General

Read "The General" reviewed by Victor Verney

There are those who insist that jazz musicians are born, not made. Swedish saxophonist Fredrik Lindborg makes an interesting exhibit in this “nature versus nurture" argument. He was determined from a very young age to become a jazz musician, and he credits this to the fact that his father began playing Charlie Parker and Billie Holiday ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

BarT: BarT Featuring Jim Beard

Read "BarT Featuring Jim Beard" reviewed by Mark Sabbatini

Sweden has always seemed like the mellow sibling of Scandinavia. Nestled between the fjords of Norway, party-hearty Denmark and the Soviet/European culture clash of Finland, Swedes maintain a squeaky clean country while talking in a soft language featuring lots of “mmm," “rrr" and other smooth sounds.



So perhaps it's not surprising the Göteborg trio ...

Bjorn Samuelsson: Jazz Formation: A Letter To Ake Persson

Read "Jazz Formation: A Letter To Ake Persson" reviewed by Ken Kase

Trombone enthusiasts can rejoice at the arrival of a new voice on an instrument which has been unjustly under-represented in the jazz canon. Regardless of Björn Samuelsson's considerable technique, fine intonation and improvisational prowess, the arrival of his debut disc featuring a quartet with trombone out front is likely to raise a few eyebrows.

Jazz ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Bjorn Samuelsson: Jazz Formation: A Letter to Ake Persson

Read "Jazz Formation: A Letter to Ake Persson" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Åke Persson (1932-75), widely known as “the Comet, is arguably the greatest jazz trombonist ever to come out of Sweden (certainly the best-known), a truly remarkable innovator who performed with a galaxy of American stars and was a mainstay in the legendary Kenny Clarke-Francy Boland Big Band, as well as Germany's RIAS Big Band. Björn Samuelsson ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Andreas Gidlund: The Happiest Man Alive

Read "The Happiest Man Alive" reviewed by Mark Sabbatini

There's something strange about how modern jazz often defies the laws of physics, which specify that two particles of matter can't occupy the same space at the same time.



Swedish saxophonist Andreas Gidlund's The Happiest Man Alive is a Michael Brecker-like fusing of contemporary jazz hooks with post bop calking (mostly the latter), the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Harri Ihanus: Eye Opener

Read "Eye Opener" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Eye Opener is a pleasant enough session of post-bop jazz by three Swedes and American tenor saxophonist Jerry Bergonzi. On the other hand, nothing to become overly excited about.

Guitarist Harri Ihanus, the nominal leader, composed each of the album's nine selections, and therein lies the rub. The music is likable but seldom rises above that. ...