All About Jazz

Home » Tag Center » Tag: Tone Cool Records

Content by tag "Tone Cool Records"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Garage a Trois: Emphasizer

Read "Emphasizer" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Three of the four players in Garage a Trois are West Coasters, which helps explain the free-wheeling home-brewed funk that pervades Emphasizer. It's only appropriate that New Orleans also make its contribution in the form of drummer Stanton Moore, a viciously adept guardian of the groove. The year-old addition of percussionist/vibraphonist Mike Dillon represents an upgrade ...

Garage a Trois: Emphasizer

Read "Emphasizer" reviewed by Mark Corroto

When was the last time you had fun listening to a jazz record?

I’m not talking about the seriousness of the neo-conservative suit-and-tie hard bopper syndrome, people who perform the “listen to this music, it’s good for you” kind. Nor the avant “we don’t expect (want) you to understand or actually like our ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Susan Tedeschi: Wait For Me

Read "Wait For Me" reviewed by Charlie B. Dahan

Listeners who preferred the rawer, rougher edge of Susan Tedeschi’s last release, Just Won’t Burn, might not enjoy her new record, but don't give up on her so fast. True, with success comes a new light shined on your work that demands you equal something you didn’t imagine would happen in the first place. Then again, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Love Dogs: New Tricks

Read "New Tricks" reviewed by Ed Kopp

The Love Dogs are eight fun-loving musicians from Boston who use Louis Jordanesque jump blues as a launching pad to other realms, including R&B, rock 'n roll and jazz. The Dogs' sound is fueled by a talented four-piece sax section augmented by vocals, piano, bass, drums and guitar.

New Tricks is the band's third ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Bernard Allison: Across the Water

Read "Across the Water" reviewed by Ed Kopp

Guitarist-vocalist Bernard Allison has inherited his father's energetic stage presence as well as his large European fan base. (Like his legendary father the late Luther Allison, Bernard lives in France.) Allison follows up his acclaimed American debut Keepin' the Blues Alive (1997) with a slicker, more mainstream effort clearly targeted at a bigger audience.

Bernard's ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Rick Holmstrom: Gonna Get Wild

Read "Gonna Get Wild" reviewed by Ed Kopp

To these ears, Rick “L.A. Holmes" Holmstrom's Lookout! was one of the best blues albums of the '90s. I marked this follow-up on my calendar the moment I heard about it. Happy to report the Mighty Flyers guitarist has done it again, but with a twist: “Holmes" sings on this one -- and he's pretty damn ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Toni Lynn Washington: Good Things

Read "Good Things" reviewed by Ed Kopp

Toni Lynn Washington sings no-nonsense R&B for discerning adults. You won’t find any needless vocal gymnastics, puerile posturing or annoying electronic effects on this lady's recordings – just soulful, mature songs from a savvy singer and her accomplished horn-based band.

Washington is known as Boston’s queen of the blues, but she’s less a blues belter ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Paul Rishell and Annie Raines: Moving to the Country

Read "Moving to the Country" reviewed by Ed Kopp

Paul Rishell (guitars) and Annie Raines (harmonicas and mandolin) are two of the most talented instrumentalists playing traditional blues today. For their superb first full album as a duo, I Want You to Know (1995), the Bostonians infused their music with various electric touches. Moving to the Country continues this trend, but not at the expense ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Rod Piazza and The Mighty Flyers: Here and Now

Read "Here and Now" reviewed by Ed Kopp

Rod Piazza and The Mighty Flyers won the 1999 W.C. Handy Award for Blues Band of the Year. Since the Handy Awards are the blues equivalent of the Grammy's, the award was no small honor for the Los Angeles quintet.

The Flyers swing out in classic West Coast style, and anybody who has caught this ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Susan Tedeschi: Just Won't Burn

Read "Just Won't Burn" reviewed by Ed Kopp

If you think white people can't sing the blues, you haven't heard 28-year-old Boston native Susan Tedeschi. Tedeschi is an immensely talented vocalist who's often compared to Janis Joplin and Bonnie Raitt, and rightfully so. Her singing is emotionally charged and very engaging on this major label debut.

It doesn't hurt that Tedeschi plays a mean ...