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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Grant Green, Jr.: Introducing G.G.

Read "Introducing G.G." reviewed by Joe Lazar

Soul Jazz is cheating. The recipe is tried and true: slick guitar, funky Rhodes and Hammond Organ, tight Drums and Bass, a full horn section. Music like this sounds good and makes folks happy with ease. It is also relatively formulaic. Such is the scenario for guitarist Grant Green, Jr.’s new album, Introducing G.G.. The selections ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Grant Green, Jr.: Introducing G.G.

Read "Introducing G.G." reviewed by Jim Santella

The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. A strong connection remains. Stepping out on his own, Grant Green, Jr. exhibits a natural affinity for the funk and blues that his late jazz guitarist father epitomized. A smooth, romantic texture emanates from his melodic instrument. Green has selected an eclectic program, including something for everyone. Mellow, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Reuben Wilson: Organ Blues

Read "Organ Blues" reviewed by Jim Santella

Reuben Wilson’s blues band settles in nice and cozy. It’s a celebration! Nods to Jimmy Smith and Jack McDuff fit appropriately into a session of traditional good time blues. Melvin Butler lends a soulful persona that stands patiently in the shadow of the late Eddie Harris. Grant Green, Jr. and leader Reuben Wilson recall the great ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Reuben Wilson: Organ Blues

Read "Organ Blues" reviewed by Jim Santella

Reuben Wilson’s blues band settles in nice and cozy. It’s a celebration! Nods to Jimmy Smith and Jack McDuff fit appropriately into a session of traditional good time blues. Melvin Butler lends a soulful persona that stands patiently in the shadow of the late Eddie Harris. Grant Green, Jr. and leader Reuben Wilson recall the great ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Indigenous People: Unite

Read "Unite" reviewed by AAJ Staff

For those unfamiliar with Marc Cary and his various ensemble fronts, “Indigenous People" is Marc Cary's groove-based ensemble that plays a varied repertoire of groove cuts taken from the loom of “African diasporic music." So then there is a melange here of Afro-Latin grooves, Jazz, African Folk, the Go Go music of Cary's youth, and raw, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Masters Of Groove: Masters Of Groove Meet Dr. No

Read "Masters Of Groove Meet Dr. No" reviewed by Jim Santella

Four seasoned veterans bring back the 1960s through a nostalgic look at the music from the first James Bond thriller. Organ, guitar, bass and drums remind us how well the organ combo fit popular music of the day. The film’s scenery, which included tropical beaches and open waters, made it possible for a variety of popular ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Marc Cary: Rhodes Ahead Vol. 1

Read "Rhodes Ahead Vol. 1" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Jazz pianist Marc Cary pays a bit of homage to the electric piano that Harold Rhodes started developing way back in the mid-forties as Leo Fender subsequently bought the rights and appended his last name to an instrument that is cherished by many a keyboardist. With Rhodes Ahead, Vol 1 Cary performs on the rhodes, and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Marc Cary: Trillium

Read "Trillium" reviewed by Jim Santella

From the moody modern mainstream, pianist Marc Cary’s trio moves deliberately with dramatic passion, then balances its program with swinging blues romps and lilting flute melodies. A powerful pianist who leans toward classical diversion, Cary grew up in the Washington, DC area, where creative music has always been well received. Once he moved to New York, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Marc Cary: Trillium

Read "Trillium" reviewed by David Adler

While this is pianist Marc Cary’s record, the first thing that jumps out at the listener is the huge sound of Tarus Mateen’s bass. Deliciously fat, woody tones like these don’t grow on trees. On this memorable trio session, Mateen and powerhouse drummer Nasheet Waits provide a rambunctious, rock-solid foundation for Cary’s profound piano ruminations. Flutist ...

Reuben Wilson: Organ Donor

Read "Organ Donor" reviewed by Douglas Payne

Reuben Wilson (born 1935) is best remembered as one of Blue Note's funkiest organists, making five albums for the label between 1968 and 1971 (only Love Bug and the excellent Blue Mode are currently available on CD). He went on to record three more records for Groove Merchant, then he whipped up some disco for smaller ...


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