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NEWS: VIDEO / DVD

J.J. and Kai: Stonebone

J.J. and Kai: Stonebone

In 1967, Creed Taylor launched CTI Records as a subsidiary of the A&M label. Creed had just left Verve, where he headed the jazz label and pioneered new concepts in young-adult jazz, including covers with abstract color photography and jazz interpretations of pop-rock and pop-soul radio hits. In New York, Creed had complete autonomy over CTI. ...

NEWS: OBITUARY

Pete Turner (1934-2017)

Pete Turner (1934-2017)

Pete Turner, a commercial photographer who befriended jazz producer Creed Taylor early in his career in the late 1950s and whose richly saturated color images were used on album covers by Creed when he was at ABC-Paramount, Impulse, Verve, A&M and, most notably, CTI, died Sept. 18. Turner was 83. Pete's iconic images were featured on ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Freddie Hubbard: Straight Life (40th Anniversary Edition)

Read "Straight Life (40th Anniversary Edition)" reviewed by Jeff Dayton-Johnson

CTI Records reissued trumpeter Freddie Hubbard's November 1970 date, Straight Life, in 2011. As with some of the other reissues in this series (see John Kelman's in-depth discussion of some of the more important of these), its availability on compact disc has been spotty. Straight Life is a good--if not great--record, and it's good to have ...

ARTICLE: EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Various Artists: CTI Records - The Cool Revolution

Read "Various Artists: CTI Records - The Cool Revolution" reviewed by John Kelman

Various Artists

CTI Records--The Cool Revolution

CTI Masterworks

2010

The late 1960s was, in many ways, a time of reckoning for jazz. While the music had continued to evolve over the previous half century, it was coincident with the emergence of rock music as a serious force that jazz began to ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Freddie Hubbard: Straight Life

Read "Straight Life" reviewed by Matt Leskovic

Creed Taylor's genre-bending CTI Records held the precarious position as the dominant jazz label during the 1970s--the decade during which the music “died. CTI was a contradiction in itself; it had as much to do with the promotion of straight-ahead, hard-swinging jazz as with spawning smoothed-out, easy-listening records that bordered on muzak. For every album as ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Nina Simone: Baltimore

Read "Baltimore" reviewed by Jim Santella

Nina Simone was called “The High Priestess of Soul." We remember her for the eclectic approach she applied to pop music and the emotion she poured into her music every time out. While Baltimore wasn't among her most memorable projects, it does offer a clear picture of the artist's spirit. This reissue provides an opportunity for ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Deodato: Deodato 2

Read "Deodato 2" reviewed by David Rickert

The surprise success of “Also Sprach Zarathrustra” on Prelude prompted Deodato to quickly follow with Deodato 2, a record that closely followed the template of his first number one hit. Deodato knew there was a lot of money to be made courting the rock audience, and there’s little on this record that could safely be called ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

George Benson: Bad Benson

Read "Bad Benson" reviewed by David Rickert

Some tunes are so sacred that any attempt to cover them can only result in failure. Yet George Benson makes this mistake twice on Bad Benson ; the band can’t quite manage a groove in 5/4 on Brubeck’s “Take Five” and once again falter with a horrid disco version of Ellington’s “Take The ‘A’ Train” complete ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Freddie Hubbard: Red Clay

Read "Red Clay" reviewed by David Rickert

Like Stanley Turrentine, Freddie Hubbard's best work was always in the service of others until he signed with Creed Taylor's CTI label. He then released a trio of albums that represents his crowning achievement as a leader. Red Clay finds him in the company of Herbie Hancock, who played a large part in defining jazz fusion, ...

Stanley Turrentine: Sugar

Read "Sugar" reviewed by David Rickert

With Sugar Stanley Turrentine finally delivered on the promise of his Blue Note albums, which were for the most part unspectacular. Following the standard blueprint of the CTI label, Turrentine runs through a handful of steamy, soul jazz workouts with some veterans from the recently deceased hard bop era as well as some up-and-comers from the ...