All About Jazz

Home » Tag Center » Tag: Collectables

Content by tag "Collectables"

ARTICLE: GETTING INTO JAZZ

Jam Session Coast To Coast/Jammin' at Condon's

Read "Jam Session Coast To Coast/Jammin' at Condon's" reviewed by Mark Barnett

Getting Started If you're new to jazz, go to our Getting Into Jazz primer for some hints on how to listen.

CD Capsule 1950's straight-ahead jazz, spiced with ad lib commentary by impressario/guitarist Condon. The musicians are laid back and having fun. Kick off your shoes and join them.

Background In the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Todd Coolman & Trifecta: Collectables

Read "Collectables" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Bassist Todd Coolman readily cops to his collections in the liner essay for this delightful date, noting a fondness for accumulating baseball caps, photos and drawings of birds, timepieces, and antique fishing tackle. But it's his collections from the realm of music--also cited in his writing(s)--that shape this date. He's amassed a stockpile of favorite songs ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joe Bushkin: In Concert Town Hall

Read "In Concert Town Hall" reviewed by David Rickert

Piano jazz is a lot like pizza; even when it's terrible, it's still fairly good. Case in point is Joe Bushkin, a fine pianist for Eddie Condon who later watered down his style to appeal to a mass audience in concerts such as this 1963 performance. One can almost hear more passionate pianists shaking their fist ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Shorty Rogers: Bossa Nova/Jazz Waltz

Read "Bossa Nova/Jazz Waltz" reviewed by David Rickert

Like Stan Kenton, Shorty Rogers led a big band that featured some of the greatest names in West Coast jazz. No less than Shelley Manne, Jimmy Giuffre, and Bob Shank appeared on early classics like The Big Shorty Rogers Express and Portrait of Shorty. However, Rogers’ band always seemed like a lot more fun to be ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joe Zawinul: The Rise & Fall of the Third Stream

Read "The Rise & Fall of the Third Stream" reviewed by David Rickert

The term “Third Stream" was coined to describe the marriage of classical and jazz music in composition and performance. Despite bordering on pretension, in most cases this ambitious movement created some of the worst records in history. Fans of either genre remained content to keep their music free from the perceived impurities of the other.

Eddie Condon: Jam Session Coast To Coast/Jammin

Read "Jam Session Coast To Coast/Jammin" reviewed by David Rickert

The biggest obstacle with the 78 format was its running time; what solos were allowed had to be brief and only crudely approximated the energy generated during a live performance. Thus Eddie Condon must have welcomed the LP era, which allowed him to indulge in the lengthy jam sessions allowed in clubs and concert halls. The ...

Eddie Condon: Midnight in Moscow/The Roaring Twenties

Read "Midnight in Moscow/The Roaring Twenties" reviewed by David Rickert

One luxury afforded Eddie Condon on the LP era was the concept album, which he explored on the two releases featured on this collection. Midnight in Moscow has the more unconvincing gimmick of the two (songs pertaining to specific countries), but is really quite good, due in large part to the double threat of Peanuts Hucko ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Johnny Hartman: The Perception Years

Read "The Perception Years" reviewed by AAJ Staff

On this two-fer disc of early '70s albums Today and I’ve Been There, the voice that went almost note for note with John Coltrane does what he does best and more (or less). Though chock full of Mercer-ized timeless ballads, this oft-dynamic duo also offers more dated and perhaps less well chosen selections. The albums range ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Gene Krupa: Boogie, Ballads, and Be-Bop: The Best of the Columbia Years 1945-1949

Read "Boogie, Ballads, and Be-Bop: The Best of the Columbia Years 1945-1949" reviewed by David Rickert

Gene Krupa’s flailing arms and floppy hair were undeniable emblems of the Big Band Era. As the first drummer to explore the uses of the full drum kit in jazz (and insist that it be miked at full volume) he helped propel Benny Goodman to stardom-who hasn’t heard the famous opening to “Sing, Sing, Sing”? His ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Rosolino: Turn Me Loose

Read "Turn Me Loose" reviewed by David Rickert

Those only familiar with Frank Rosolino’s trombone work may be surprised to find out that he also dabbled in vocals as well. Rosolino was highly regarded as a trombonist, especially on the West Coast scene, but seldom recorded as a leader; Free For All on the Specialty label is probably his best known work. Turn Me ...