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Ned Kelly's Last Stand, Hong Kong

Read "Ned Kelly's Last Stand, Hong Kong" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

Most guides to Hong Kong list the genre melding Fringe and Bert's and the loungish Blue Room among the city's jazz venues. Very few mention “Ned Kelly's Last Stand." The oldest Hong Kong pub has presented live music sessions from the start. Among those who have graced its stage include vocalist Rosemary Clooney, saxophonist Charlie Barnet ...

The Cotton Club, Shanghai

Read "The Cotton Club, Shanghai" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

On the night of April 15th 2016 the Cotton Club in Shanghai was teaming with young, fashionably dressed locals and intrigued tourists. Despite the overpriced drinks and extra charge for sitting down at a table (even standing at one) music lovers packed the small space. Located in the historic and hip French Concession neighborhood, The Cotton ...

Club Jazzda: Seoul's Hidden Gem

Read "Club Jazzda: Seoul's Hidden Gem" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

One of the hidden gems of the Seoul music scene in South Korea is the Club Jazzda. Located in the youthful Mapo neighborhood, the intimate basement venue has live music every night of the week showcasing young, up-and-coming local talent.

Trumpeter Ye Jung Kim owns this intimate listening room, and sometimes joins the musicians ...

Rio de Janeiro’s shrine to Brazil’s fabled Bossa Nova

Read "Rio de Janeiro’s shrine to Brazil’s fabled Bossa Nova" reviewed by Mark Holston

While CD stores have virtually disappeared in most countries, Brazil remains a notable exception. In most large cities, specialty shops featuring contemporary and historic recordings by the country's legendary music-makers are still prospering. Visitors from abroad will delight in finding so much entrancing Brazilian sound at their fingertips.

Enter the multi-level Bossa Nova & ...

ARTICLE: ROADS LESS TRAVELLED

Eric Dolphy: A Deeply Dedicated Musician

Read "Eric Dolphy: A Deeply Dedicated Musician" reviewed by Nic Jones

In the forty years since his death Eric Dolphy's career has taken on a kind of substance that it never had in his lifetime. Partly this is due to the course jazz has taken within those forty years, one of the end results of which is a scene that in many ways is more conservative now ...

Art Pepper: West Coastin'

Read "Art Pepper: West Coastin'" reviewed by Nic Jones

The last article in this series discussed the most significant strand in the recording history of Sonny Criss , a musician who was unjustly neglected during his lifetime. By contrast, Art Pepper might have been overexposed during his. If so, then this was a process helped in no small part by his autobiography1 in which he ...

Sonny Criss: Catching The Sun

Read "Sonny Criss: Catching The Sun" reviewed by Nic Jones

There have sometimes been itinerant qualities to the jazz musician's life, not only in terms of where they've lived, but also where and when they recorded. Sonny Criss spent the best part of his life in Los Angeles, and the sad fact is that the devotion he showed not only to the city and its people ...

Buddy Tate From Texas State

Read "Buddy Tate From Texas State" reviewed by Nic Jones

By the end of the 1930s both the Count Basie and Duke Ellington bands had established signature styles of music making that were in some respects antithetical. Whilst the latter was dependent on composition as an integral part of its musical output -and arguably no-one before or since has married composition and the making of jazz ...

Peter Brotzmann: Der Kaput Play

Read "Peter Brotzmann: Der Kaput Play" reviewed by Nic Jones

The cultural life of post-war West Germany was always subject to significant American influence, and though this may seem surprising on the surface it says a lot about American hegemony in this period and the means through which it was acheived. Julian Cope has quite rightly highlighted the presence of American service personnel as a agent ...

Albert Ayler: Backwards And Forwards

Read "Albert Ayler: Backwards And Forwards" reviewed by Nic Jones

By March of 1965, when the first of the Village Vanguard recordings were made, Albert Ayler's career as a leader was less that five years old. He'd covered a lot of ground. It was also only thirteen years since he'd worked in Little Walter's band, yet in that time he'd moved as far away from the ...