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ARTICLE: BOOK REVIEWS

Blues Legacies And Black Feminism

Read "Blues Legacies And Black Feminism" reviewed by John Ballon

Angela Y. Davis
Blues Legacies And Black Feminism:
Gertrude “Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday
Vintage
1999
ISBN 0679771263

In her exploration of Gertrude “Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday, Angela Davis reveals how these women helped shape black and feminist consciousness ...

ARTICLE: MUST HEAR REVIEW

Grant Green: Carryin' On

Read "Grant Green: Carryin' On" reviewed by John Ballon

Having firmly established himself as the '60s jazz guitarist second only to the great Wes Montgomery, Grant Green was willing and able to move into something new and give himself up to the emerging funk wave that would seep across the '70s.

Attacked by purists as Grant's grand selling-out, these recordings have been rediscovered and widely ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Horace Silver: Horace Silver: Re-Entry

Read "Horace Silver: Re-Entry" reviewed by John Ballon

Rare and essential live recordings that capture the great Horace Silver Quintet in action at New York City's Half-Note.

Always a force to be reckoned with, Silver's mid-60s band was consistently adventurous, original, and funky, anchored in the steady rhythms of bassist Larry Ridley and drummer Roger Humphries, and steeped in the passion ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

John Coltrane: Ole

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John Coltrane never stopped wondering what he wanted from music, and never stopped pushing the boundaries. Trane genuinely strove to be saintly in his devotion to the divine, creating a body of deeply spiritual music that has come to be regarded as holy by his many devotees. His musical legacy was officially consecrated in 1971, when ...

ARTICLE: MUST HEAR REVIEW

The Crusaders: Crusaders I

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Most people think that when the Jazz Crusaders dropped the “Jazz" from their name, they also dropped the jazz from their playing. When the band first decided to call themselves the Crusaders, it was only to expand their musical horizons beyond what was narrowly defined as “jazz" at the time. True, the band quickly came to ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Donald Byrd: Donald Byrd: Electric Byrd

Read "Donald Byrd: Electric Byrd" reviewed by John Ballon

Considered by some to be trumpeter Donald Byrd's last worthwhile jazz recording, Electric Byrd is a high-flying relic from 1970. This album can be understood as Byrd's formidable response to the musical challenges set down by trumpet-rival Miles Davis with his epic Bitches Brew recordings from a year earlier. Clearly Miles is the ghost presence here, ...

ARTICLE: MUST HEAR REVIEW

Donald Byrd: Kofi

Read "Donald Byrd: Kofi" reviewed by John Ballon

An album of previously unreleased material taken from two 1969-1970 sessions which capture the immensely talented trumpeter Donald Byrd in a transitional moment of artistic brilliance. The first two tracks, “Kofi" and “Fufu," were both recorded during the 1969 session, and are the most original and imaginative compositions on the album. Rooted in the hypnotic African-infused ...

ARTICLE: MUST HEAR REVIEW

Charles Lloyd: Forest Flower

Read "Charles Lloyd: Forest Flower" reviewed by John Ballon

Recorded live at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966, Forest Flower was the jazz soundtrack of the Flower Power movement. Always accessible and majestic, the Charles Lloyd Quartet was recorded here at the peak of its powers. The title track, “Forest Flower," actually is split into two parts, “Sunrise" and “Sunset," which merge together seamlessly to ...

ARTICLE: MUST HEAR REVIEW

George Benson: The Other Side Of Abbey Road

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I first heard The Other Side Of Abbey Road at a cozy coffee shop in Hollywood, California, early in my jazz discovery days. At the time, I was just recovering from a heavy overdose on the Beatles, having listened to all their post-LSD records almost exclusively for several months. I was ready for something new, and ...

ARTICLE: MUST HEAR REVIEW

Ray Barretto: Acid

Read "Ray Barretto: Acid" reviewed by John Ballon

By the time 1968 rolled around, Ray Barretto was a celebrated studio session player whose hard-driving conga rhythms could be heard all over the records of Dizzy Gillespie, Cal Tjader, Cannonball Adderley, and countless others. Once he dropped Acid onto the music world, Barretto firmly established a reputation for himself as an innovator in his own ...