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Dexter Gordon

Dexter Gordon is considered to be the first musician to translate the language of Bebop to the tenor saxophone. Dexter Keith Gordon was born on February 27, 1923 in Los Angeles, California. His father, Dr. Frank Gordon, was one of the first African American doctors in Los Angeles who arrived in 1918 after graduating from Howard Medical School in Washington, D.C. Among his patients were Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton. Dexter's mother, Gwendolyn Baker, was the daughter of Captain Edward Baker, one of the five African American Medal of Honor recipients in the Spanish-American War. He began his study of music with the clarinet at age 13, then switched to the alto saxophone at 15, and finally to the tenor saxophone at 17

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Belgrade Jazz Festival 2019

Read "Belgrade Jazz Festival 2019" reviewed by Martin Longley

Belgrade Jazz Festival Dom Omladine / Kombank Dvorana Belgrade Serbia October 22-28, 2019 Reaching its 35th edition, the Belgrade Jazz Festival added extra shows at the beginning and end of its run, making up a full week, or eight days, if the opening dj night is ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Emmet Cohen: Masters Legacy Series Volume 4: Emmet Cohen Featuring George Coleman

Read "Masters Legacy Series Volume 4: Emmet Cohen Featuring George Coleman" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

So here we are, nearly knocking on the door to February 2020, and we're listening to the second of Emmet Cohen's two entrancing, late 2019 releases: Masters Legacy Series Vol. 4 Emmet Cohen featuring George Coleman--a good harbinger for the new year. And heaven knows we could use a boatload of good harbingers these exhausting days. ...

ARTICLE: PROFILES

Pete Brown: White Rooms & Imaginary Westerns, Part 1

Read "Pete Brown: White Rooms & Imaginary Westerns, Part 1" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Part 1 | Part 2 Poet, lyricist, rock musician, producer and scriptwriter—Pete Brown has covered a lot of bases in his six decades in music and literature. His career embodies that era that began with the Beatles' “Love Me Do" in October 1962 and ended in January 1969 with the band playing live on ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Emmet Cohen: Master Legacy Series Volume 3 Featuring Benny Golson & Albert "Tootie" Heath

Read "Master Legacy Series Volume 3 Featuring Benny Golson & Albert "Tootie" Heath" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Set aside for the moment that the combined age of the elders here is 174 years. Emmet Cohen's Masters Legacy Series Volume 3 Featuring Benny Golson & Albert “Tootie" Heath is not only a mouthful of a title, but also irascibly and irrepressibly old school. It's as if Cohen, in his youthful (29) zeal and zest ...

ARTICLE: YEAR IN REVIEW

2019: The Year in Jazz

Read "2019: The Year in Jazz" reviewed by Ken Franckling

The year 2019 was robust in many ways. International Jazz Day brought its biggest stage to Australia. An important but long-shuttered jazz mecca was revived in a coast-to-coast move. ECM Records celebrated a golden year. The music and its makers figured prominently on the big screen. The National Endowment for the Arts welcomed four new NEA ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

It's Christmas Again

Read "It's Christmas Again" reviewed by Marc Cohn

So, we've got our usual group of holiday favorites. But wait! There's more. We've got a new Eight Track Christmas from guitarist Dave Stryker, a stupendous live Jazzy Christmas concert from trumpeter Paolo Fresu (and I mean truly stupendous! I've listened to the CD at least six times while putting this show together). And it's a ...

ARTICLE: HISTORY OF JAZZ

Coleman Hawkins: Fifty Years Gone, A Saxophone Across Time

Read "Coleman Hawkins: Fifty Years Gone, A Saxophone Across Time" reviewed by Arthur R George

Fifty years ago this past year, Coleman Hawkins, considered the father of tenor saxophone in jazz, passed away. Thelonious Monk was pacing back and forth in the hallway outside Hawkins' hospital room when the saxophonist succumbed at age 64 on the morning of May 19, 1969, from pneumonia and other complications. Monk was holding a short ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Mal Waldron: Free At Last

Read "Free At Last" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

The sensitivity reflected in much of Mal Waldron's music was a deep aspect of his psyche. The Harlem-born pianist, who died in Brussels, Belgium, in 2002, worked downtown with saxophonist Ike Quebec at Café Society in the early 1950s and went on to record on several Charles Mingus recordings including Pithecanthropus Erectus (Atlantic), Jazz Composers Workshop ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Eric Alexander, Tristano and Nat Cole Centennials & Ellingtonia

Read "Eric Alexander, Tristano and Nat Cole Centennials & Ellingtonia" reviewed by Marc Cohn

Tenor saxophonist Eric Alexander appeared in Baton Rouge Tuesday, November 19th @ the Manship Theatre, downtown Baton Rouge. So we warmed you up for his visit with his trio and quartet work, as well as a sideman with Mike LeDonne on the B-3 and pianist Junior Mance (knee deep in the blues). There's also our last ...


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