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Alphonse Mouzon: In Search Of A Dream

Read "In Search Of A Dream" reviewed by Chris May

2018 is the 50th anniversary of the founding of the distinguished German jazz label MPS. To mark the occasion, the label's catalogue of over 400 albums has been released on download, and a vinyl and CD remastering and reissue programme has begun. Alphonse Mouzon's In Search Of A Dream is among the first of these discs. ...

Claus Waidtlow: A New Beginning

Read "A New Beginning" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

Saxophonist Claus Waidtløw has been a vital part of the Danish jazz scene for many years. At the beginning of the '90s, he was already established on the scene and in 1997 he released his debut as a leader, Claustrophobia, on Stunt Records (notice the use of the pun on the saxophonist's name in the title). ...

Stafford Hunter: Continuum

Read "Continuum" reviewed by Paul Rauch

Stafford Hunter is known as a trombonist who grew out of the modern paradigm set by Steve Turre. He also shares a unique quality with Turre, in that he is an expert player of conch shells in the jazz idiom, joining him in the ensemble, Steve Turre and Sanctified Shells.

While this tie with ...

Salvo Losappio: Long Story Short

Read "Long Story Short" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Although Long Story Short is an entirely appropriate title for Italian-born tenor saxophonist Salvo Losappio's debut CD as leader, as its playing time is a lean LP-like thirty-eight minutes, Rush Job might have been an even better one. Losappio's name and face adorn the front cover of the album, which names his four sidemen but does ...

NEWS: BIRTHDAY

Jazz Musician of the Day: Richard "Groove" Holmes

Jazz Musician of the Day: Richard "Groove" Holmes

All About Jazz is celebrating Richard “Groove" Holmes' birthday today!

Richard Arnold “Groove" Holmes, Born Richard Arnold Jackson (Camden, New Jersey) was a jazz organist who performed in the hard bop and soul jazz genre. He is best known for his 1965 recording of “Misty," and is considered a precursor of acid jazz. Holmes burst ...

ARTICLE: BAILEY'S BUNDLES

Six on Cellar Live

Read "Six on Cellar Live" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Cory Weeds' record label Cellar Live has become a welcome home to straight-ahead mainstream jazz in the same way that Arbors Records has been the beacon for traditional jazz and swing. Think Norman Granz's Pablo label tele-transported deep into the 21st Century. Six recent releases illuminate Cellar Live's importance to jazz as a whole and to ...

ARTICLE: MULTIPLE REVIEWS

A Selection of Jazz on Sonorama

Read "A Selection of Jazz on Sonorama" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

A good record is not just an album, it is a story, and few people understand this better than Ekkehart Fleischhammer, who runs Sonorama. The label specializes in reissues and discoveries of lost jazz classics, library music, funk and soul. Every release is a labor of love and the albums in the following batch all include ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Julian Pressley: From The Duke To Ornette In His Own Way

Read "Julian Pressley: From The Duke To Ornette In His Own Way" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Julian Pressley isn't exactly a household name, but it's a name every jazz aficionado should know. When he plays his alto saxophone, ears perk up because he's playing what they came to hear: music that embodies the legacy. Passionate, quick-witted, and full of new ideas, Pressley stands out in the crowd, a genuine original. Yet you ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part II: New York

Read "Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part II: New York" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Jazz didn't abandon jny: Chicago but its further development only began to take on a distinct personality in the 1960s. By the late 1920s, the next phase of the jazz scene had shifted from Chicago to New York though, initially, there was no red carpet rolled out. As jazz bands made their way to New York ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Aki Takase: Cherry ‎– Sakura

Read "Cherry ‎– Sakura" reviewed by John Sharpe

Twenty three years after their first studio date Blue Monk (Enja, 1993), Japanese pianist Aki Takase and American saxophonist David Murray reunite in Switzerland. There has been one live recording since, Valencia (Sound Hills, 1997), but the question remains what took them so long? The saxophone/piano axis has been a favored format for both. Murray's companions ...