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Content by tag "Australia"

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Tim Buckley: Live At The Troubadour 1969

Read "Live At The Troubadour 1969" reviewed by Sacha O'Grady

For an artist whose recording career spanned less than ten years, Tim Buckley seemed to get a lot done. From 1966's self titled debut, to Look At The Fool, his final album released in 1974, Buckley's oeuvre is as broad as it is varied. Ever the experimental troubadour, no other singer of the time was capable ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Kucheza

Read "Kucheza" reviewed by Sacha O'Grady

Jazz has certainly come a long way since its early beginnings, whose free spirit and richness of form means that one could easily spend a whole lifetime marvelling at its infinite variety. And none more so than on Kucheza, the MoFrancesco Quintetto's sublime and engaging new album. Based in Lisbon, Portugal, European jazz doesn't get any ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Miles Davis: Panthalassa: The Music Of Miles Davis 1969-1974

Read "Panthalassa: The Music Of Miles Davis 1969-1974" reviewed by Sacha O'Grady

For anyone unfamiliar with his work, Bill Laswell is something of a producer's producer, who has worked with a wide array of artists ranging from John Lydon to Whitney Houston (though not on the same record one would assume). At some point Laswell miraculously managed to convince the powers that be to hand over copies of ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jack Kerouac & Steve Allen: Poetry For The Beat Generation

Read "Poetry For The Beat Generation" reviewed by Sacha O'Grady

Jack Kerouac is most famous for his iconic novel On the Road, a book which helped define an entire generation of drifters, hitchhikers, poets and musicians (although not exclusively in that order), all of whom Kerouac collectively coined as “The Beat Generation." Upon publication in 1957, On the Road was celebrated by The New York Times ...

NEWS: TRENDS

Down Under, Streaming Is Up, Downloads Are Down

Down Under, Streaming Is Up, Downloads Are Down

In an extension of a music industry consumer trend seen in the United States, it seems our neighbors to the south are embracing the streaming age, as Australians increasingly eschew CDs and downloads in exchange for streaming. Guest post by Glenn Peoples of Pandora  OK, not a big surprise here. Over the last two years, more Australians are ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

John McLaughlin, Al DiMeola, Paco DeLucia: Friday Night in San Francisco

Read "Friday Night in San Francisco" reviewed by Sacha O'Grady

On 5th December, 1980, Al Di Meola, John McLaughlin, and Paco De Lucia were two months into what had so far been an extremely successful and creative tour. Even just the concept itself was intriguing--three guitarists, and acoustic to boot! With not a drummer, percussionist, or bassist in sight. The sheer novelty of it all. Recorded ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Refraction: Inerrant Space

Read "Inerrant Space" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Refraction is an Australian piano trio led by drummer Chris Broomhead, who also composed most of the music. He is joined by pianist Brenton Foster (who contributes two tunes) and double bassist Jordan Tarento. Inerrant Space definitely does not sound like a “drummer's album." It's very much a group sound, as the collective group name implies. ...

John Coltrane: Interstellar Space

Read "Interstellar Space" reviewed by Sacha O'Grady

As the '60s dawned it would seem that John Coltrane was determined to permanently turn his back on being an accessible artist. Often considered as one of his most influential works, Interstellar Space is certainly not for everyone. Fans of My Favorite Things and Blue Train may struggle with its seemingly random and “multidirectional" explorations. Also, ...

Daevid Allen Weird Quartet: Elevenses

Read "Elevenses" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Australian, Daevid Allen was one of the original progressive rock wizards who founded Soft Machine and Gong, nestled within the British Canterbury movement and beyond. Sadly, he passed away on March 13, 2016. Elevenses will stand-- barring any reissues from the vault--as his final album and the second release by his Weird Quartet.

Allen's ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Alister Spence: Live

Read "Live" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Alister Spence Trio: Live is, apparently, this Australian group's sixth recording. Sadly, the others have passed me by and pianist Alister Spence only recently crossed my CD deck in the company of Scottish saxophonist / improviser Raymond MacDonald. To be honest, much contemporary piano trio jazz--EST, Brad Mehldau, The Necks--bores me. Perhaps unfairly so but to ...