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ARTICLE: BOOK EXCERPTS

Jive-Colored Glasses

Read "Jive-Colored Glasses" reviewed by John Goodman

The following is an excerpt from “Chapter 4: Chicago" of Jive-Colored Glasses by John F Goodman (jg publications, 2015).

Growing up in and around jny: Chicago in the 1950s brought me to all kinds and flavors of jazz. Between the house parties, clubs and concerts, there was a menu to please everyone. The Rush ...

NEWS: RECORDING

Art Hodes: I Remember Bessie

Art Hodes: I Remember Bessie

The end of World War II remains the most profound demarcation in jazz history. Jazz changed so radically and abruptly after 1945 that fans of the music split into two bickering camps. Pre-war jazz fans argued that their music had structure, charm and romanticism that post-war jazz lacked. Post-war jazz fans countered that their music was ...

NEWS: RADIO

Unplugged Jazz With Guitarist Marty Grosz This Week On Riverwalk Jazz

Unplugged Jazz With Guitarist Marty Grosz This Week On Riverwalk Jazz

Riverwalk Jazz this week features a giant of jazz rhythm guitar—Marty Grosz. His career spans over 60 years. Equal parts showman, jazz scholar and raconteur, Marty is a virtuoso in a playing style that’s both timeless and so far off the radar it’s all but lost in today’s music world. The program is distributed in the US ...

Art Hodes: Up In Volly's Room

Read "Up In Volly's Room" reviewed by Jack Huntley

Throughout his long career in and around the music industry, Art Hodes was a dedicated lover of what is now termed traditional jazz but was then the current, dynamic confluence of blues, ragtime and Dixieland influences. Coming of age in Chicago's vibrant 1920s music scene, Hodes digested the sounds of transplanted New Orleans musicians such as ...

Papa Bue: 80 at 80

Read "80 at 80" reviewed by Chris Mosey

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. It was an age of duffle coats, beards, sandals and sunglasses. It was the age of Trad. It was how European youth discovered jazz. Britain had Chris Barber, Ken Colyer and, a little further down the line--by which time newspaper headlines were referring to ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Art Hodes: Friar's Inn Revisited

Read "Friar's Inn Revisited" reviewed by AAJ Italy Staff

L’intento era quello di riproporre la musica dei New Orleans Rhythm Kings, il miglior gruppo bianco di jazz tradizionale nella Chicago degli anni ’20. A far rivivere la gioiosa prassi strumentale di Paul Mares e Leon Roppolo è un sestetto di veterani del jazz delle origini, capitanato dal pianista Art Hodes (1904-1993). Figura di spicco di tale prassi strumentale, ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Art Hodes: Friar's Inn Revisited

Read "Friar's Inn Revisited" reviewed by Nic Jones

Delmark has hit the spot with this reissue in terms of music as social history. Trombonist George Brunis and clarinetist Volly DeFaut were both members of the New Orleans Rhythm Kings, a band that played Friar's Inn in Chicago in the 1920s, and at the time this music was caught--over the course of various dates in ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Art Hodes: Tribute to the Greats

Read "Tribute to the Greats" reviewed by Derek Taylor

As Delmark CEO and Chicago fixture for nearly half a century, Bob Koester makes no bones about his deep affection for traditional jazz. Throughout the idiom’s periodic lean years he’s provided a safe harbor of sorts for musicians’ to keep their sounds alive by financing new recording dates and re-pressing old ones. Art Hodes, radio host, ...

Art Hodes: Vintage Art Hodes

Read "Vintage Art Hodes" reviewed by Mike Neely

Vintage Art Hodes documents the solo piano work of an early jazz master, a neglected one who belongs in the pantheon of James P. Johnson, Earl Hines, and Teddy Wilson. He was low-key and self-effacing musically, but few pianists were as solid in both the accompanist and solo roles. Also, few pianists have had such a ...

Art Hodes & Barney Bigard: Bucket's Got a Hole in It

Read "Bucket's Got a Hole in It" reviewed by Jack Bowers

This session, recorded in Chicago in January 1968, teams two acknowledged masters of New Orleans–style classic Jazz with a well–endowed supporting cast (bassist Rails, drummer Deems) and, on half a dozen tracks, a brace of accomplished guests, trombonist George Brunis and trumpeter Nap Trottier. Two of those tracks are alternate takes (“Tin Roof Blues,” “Bye and ...