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ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Yellowjackets: Raising Our Voice

Read "Raising Our Voice" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Named after a rather unpleasant insect, founded by a guitar superstar to back him but then dropped, the Los Angeles-based Yellowjackets--despite it all--continue to forge ahead. There's something of the MJQ about them: they dress well (if casually) and play a brand of jazz that is discreet and refined, sometimes almost to the point of becoming ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jonathan Butler: Close To You

Read "Close To You" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Dearly Beloved, Jonathan Butler having loudly--even hysterically, you might feel--proclaimed to the world that he has fallen in love with Jesus, let us consider his latest album and ponder Verse Two of “I'll Never Fall In Love Again" by Messrs. Hal David and Burt Bacharach:

What do you get when you kiss a ...

Erroll Garner: Night Concert

Read "Night Concert" reviewed by Chris Mosey

It's the jazz equivalent of finding a Van Gogh or a Ming vase in the attic: the discovery of a complete, perfectly-recorded 1964 concert by one of the music's greatest virtuoso solo pianists. In the beginning was Art Tatum. Then came Oscar Peterson. Finally--and in many ways the most interesting of the holy trinity--Erroll Garner.

Brian Bromberg: Thicker Than Water

Read "Thicker Than Water" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Brian Bromberg specializes in smooth jazz. That's music with rough edges removed. He plays it on basses, upright and electric, and on piccolo basses which are tuned to sound like guitars.

It's all fiendishly clever but Bromberg remains modest. He uses a whole side of the album's cover to thank everyone, including God, ...

Erroll Garner: Nightconcert

Read "Nightconcert" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Erroll Garner's exuberance and love for his instrument, his music, his players, and his audience breaks today's poisoned and polarized air from the very first note of “Where or When" from Nightconcert, the archival release from the Erroll Garner Project, released on Mack Avenue Records.

Recorded with a visceral intimacy and immediacy on November ...

Erroll Garner: Night Concert

Read "Night Concert" reviewed by Chris Mosey

It's the jazz equivalent of finding a Van Gogh or a Ming vase in the attic: the discovery of a complete 1964 perfectly recorded concert by one of the music's greatest virtuoso solo pianists. In the beginning was Art Tatum. Then came Oscar Peterson. Finally--and in many ways the most interesting of the holy trinity--was Erroll ...

Tia Fuller: Diamond Cut

Read "Diamond Cut" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

The engaging and enjoyable Diamond Cut is saxophonist Tia Fuller's fifth release as a leader and the first without a pianist. Fuller deftly fronts a different rhythm section on each half of the album. The only constant is guitarist Adam Rogers, whose restless, explorative style is the perfect foil for Fuller's ardent, poetic wit.

Christian Sands: Reach Further

Read "Reach Further" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

With full gale Monk-ian intensity and flair, pianist Christian Sands' five song EP, Reach Further bursts open with “J-Street" like the grandest, most swinging first flower in the new jazz garden. Then you hit repeat. Repeat again. Then you remember there are four more songs and the garden bursts with color.

Comprised of two ...

Cyrille Aimee: Cyrille Aimee Live

Read "Cyrille Aimee Live" reviewed by Chris Mosey

As a little girl, Cyrille Aimée would climb out of the bedroom window of her home in Samois-sur-Seine, near Fontainbleau in northern France and run off to join local gypsies by their camp fires, playing jazz and singing just as they did with Django Reinhardt (who is buried nearby).

Reinhardt never managed to ...

Stanley Clarke: Stanley Clarke Band: The Message

Read "Stanley Clarke Band: The Message" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Once upon a time, he was the enfant terrible of jazz bassists, whizz-kid of Chick Corea's Return to Forever. On his latest album, The Message, at the ripe old age of 66, Stanley Clarke is very much the elder statesman, standing back on the cover pic, arms crossed, letting the youngsters grab the limelight and not ...