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Julian Pressley: From The Duke To Ornette In His Own Way

Read "Julian Pressley: From The Duke To Ornette In His Own Way" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Julian Pressley isn't exactly a household name, but it's a name every jazz aficionado should know. When he plays his alto saxophone, ears perk up because he's playing what they came to hear: music that embodies the legacy. Passionate, quick-witted, and full of new ideas, Pressley stands out in the crowd, a genuine original. Yet you ...


Michael Waldrop: Origin Suite

Read "Origin Suite" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Drummer / vibraphonist Michael Waldrop's intriguing Origin Suite (deftly arranged by Jack Cooper) sweeps away musical boundaries to make its points, one of which is that big-band jazz needn't be ensnared in a time warp but is capable of changing with the times to engender songs that are as aesthetically pleasing as they are thematically stylish. ...


Wes Montgomery: One Night in Indy

Read "One Night in Indy" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

In the Resonance Wes Montgomery catalog, One Night in Indy: Featuring the Eddie Higgins Trio (2016) falls in between In The Beginning (Resonance, 2015) and Smokin' in Seattle: Live At the Penthouse 1966 (Resonance, 2017). It is documentation of Montgomery, appearing with the Eddie Higgins Trio at the Indianapolis Jazz Club, January 18, 1959. These performances, ...


Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part III: Kansas City, Philadelphia, Los Angeles & Beyond

Read "Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part III: Kansas City, Philadelphia, Los Angeles & Beyond" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Beyond the Hubs

While jny: New Orleans, jny: Chicago, jny: Kansas City and jny: New York City were the incubators of modern jazz, they were by no means the only locations with an appetite for live music. Jazz artists whose point of origin could not sustain multiple venues ventured to locations near and far ...

Curtis Stigers with the Danish Radio Big Band: One More For The Road

Read "One More For The Road" reviewed by Angelo Leonardi

Curtis Stigers è un cantante pop che ha debuttato nel 1991 con brani di grande appeal commerciale come “I Wonder Why," “Never Saw a Miracle" e “You're All That Matters to Me." Per un decennio ha variato leggermente quel patinato blend di pop, soul, smooth jazz, folk e rock, fino ad abbracciare più decisamente il jazz ...

ears&eyes Records: From Chicago to the World

Read "ears&eyes Records: From Chicago to the World" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

Those who feel that jazz has run out of steam, that there is nothing new to say, should encounter bassist and renaissance man, Matthew Golombisky, who runs the Chicago-based label ears&eyes. The name says it all. Golombisky is interested in what is going on around him. He is not only curious about music, but also passionate ...


Tyler Mire Big Band: #Office for the Day

Read "#Office for the Day" reviewed by Nicholas F. Mondello

Social Media has spewed forth a cornucopia of emoticons, symbols, and catchphrases that have Twittered their way into Webster's. The title of trumpeter/composer/arranger Tyler Mire's (pronounced “Meer") latest effort -"#Office for the Day" -is one example of a phrase that's particularly loved by musicians. However, there's nothing common or over-washed out about this latest fine effort ...


Count Basie: New Testament Band

Count Basie: New Testament Band

The history of the Count Basie orchestra is generally divided into two broad periods—the Old Testament band, which lasted from 1935 to 1950, and the New Testament band, which lasted from 1952 until Basie's death in 1984. The former orchestra thrived in the 78 era and was marked by frantic riffs, the blues and a cavalcade ...


Seal: Standards

Read "Standards" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

It shouldn't be a surprise that Seal would take on the American songbook, with a baritone that was made for classics like “Autumn Leaves" and “Love for Sale." Born Henry Olusegun Adeola Samuel in Paddington, England, the singer, guitarist and composer rose to fame with his global hits, and Grammy-winning songs, “Crazy" and “Kiss From a ...


Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part II: New York

Read "Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part II: New York" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Jazz didn't abandon jny: Chicago but its further development only began to take on a distinct personality in the 1960s. By the late 1920s, the next phase of the jazz scene had shifted from Chicago to New York though, initially, there was no red carpet rolled out. As jazz bands made their way to New York ...