All About Jazz

Home » Tag Center » Tag: David A. Orthmann

Content by tag "David A. Orthmann"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Patrick Cornelius: This Should Be Fun

Read "This Should Be Fun" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

This Should Be Fun occupies middle ground between the various modes of experimentation that infuse present-day jazz, and a fealty to traditional practices. Alto saxophonist Patrick Cornelius and an exceptional band of peers haven't completely abandoned twentieth century jazz orthodoxy, yet their work doesn't flaunt or reference specific, easily recognizable influences. If you're looking for song ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Josh Lawrence: Triptych

Read "Triptych" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Triptych succeeds on the connection between Josh Lawrence's writing and a coterie of players with whom he has been associated for several years. A brilliant, enterprising band comprised of the leader's trumpet, pianist Zaccai Curtis, his brother, bassist Luques Curtis, alto saxophonist Caleb Curtis (no relation), and drummer Anwar Marshall readily embrace the contours of Lawence's ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

David Hazeltine: The Time Is Now

Read "The Time Is Now" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

David Hazeltine's thirty-fourth date as a leader juxtaposes his strengths as a composer, interpreter of standard material, improviser, as well as the capacity to converse and interact with his peers. There's something magical about the ways in which the pianist employs these skills, avoiding emphasizing one at the expense of the others, and in doing so ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Lucas Pino: That's a Computer

Read "That's a Computer" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Lucas Pino's No Net Nonet has claimed a piece of turf within the vast, sprawling, crowded field of the jazz mainstream. Its brilliantly conceived and executed efforts resist additional stylistic distinctions. Teamwork, mutually reinforcing concerns and a spirit of adventure infuse the seven tracks of That's A Computer. The compositions and arrangements by the leader, as ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Michael Kocour: East Of The Sun

Read "East Of The Sun" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Michael Kocour's solo piano recital is comprised of great American songs, most of which were popular in the early-to-mid twentieth century. There's nothing dated or anachronistic about the ways in which he handles the material. Throughout the record's ten tracks, Kocour establishes a state of equilibrium between a fealty to traditional song forms and jazz practices; ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Kihong Jang: They Brought A New Kind of Music To Me

Read "They Brought A New Kind of Music To Me" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Kihong Jang's debut record as a leader is the antithesis of the hectic, anxious character of many contemporary jazz releases. The guitarist's unassuming approach contains an impressive degree of depth and certainty for a young musician. The disc's six tracks offer affably swinging sounds that aren't particularly knotty, convoluted or strained. Original compositions, choice of tempos ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Rob Garcia: Drum Solos For Dancers Only

Read "Drum Solos For Dancers Only" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

There's more than enough artistry, craftsmanship and ingenuity in Rob Garcia's Drum Solos For Dancers Only to please the sedentary jazz aficionado. Although the thirteen tracks are intended to spur bodies in motion, his drumming merits scrutiny on purely musical terms. For the most part Garcia executes swinging rhythms much like the ones that drove the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Dmitry Baevsky / Jeb Patton: We Two

Read "We Two" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Alto saxophonist Dmitry Baevsky and pianist Jeb Patton constitute a crackerjack, precision jazz instrument, stretching and bending the fundamentals of bebop into full-blown statements that render the absence of a bassist and drummer superfluous. The individual heroics that one expects of bop are in evidence, but it's the ways in which the duo maneuvers as a ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Michael Dease: Bonafide

Read "Bonafide" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Listening critically to recently produced mainstream-jazz recordings often feels like prospecting for gold amidst the dross of familiar templates, all-too-common stylistic references, and unremarkable performances. However, occasionally, even when a record doesn't hang together particularly well and is likely to disappear under the weight of scores of similar sounding releases, diligence is rewarded by a track ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Doron Tirosh: Simply Because It's Winter

Read "Simply Because It's Winter" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Drummer/composer Doron Tirosh's Simply Because It's Winter brings to mind the adage “good things come in small packages." The six tracks comprise a coherent piece of work in twenty-five minutes of running time. Along with pianist Michael Kanan and bassist Neal Miner, Tirosh achieves a kind of courtly, non-doctrinaire bebop essence. It's jazz that doesn't need ...