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Content by tag "Mark Corroto"

Quinsin Nachoff: Quinsin Nachoff's Ethereal Trio

Read "Quinsin Nachoff's Ethereal Trio" reviewed by Mark Corroto

It's interesting how modern jazz performers come to the music from very different circumstances than those of players of bygone eras. Instead of learning their craft in a bar or bagnio, they went to a conservatory to sharpen their chops. What they lack in perceived street-smarts (the outdated 1950s hipster delusion of jazzman as junkie), they ...

Martin Küchen: The Spirit Of Piteşti

Read "The Spirit Of Piteşti" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Sometimes a scene in a movie or a book persists in the mind long after being viewed or read. Sometimes an aroma can conjure a feeling from the past. Memory is often connected to emotion in an unconscious manner. Substitute sound for scent and the passions can be equally strong. The Swedish/Norwegian trio of saxophonist Martin ...

Per Gärdin/Pedro Lopes/Rodrigo Pinheiro: History Of The Lisbon Chaplaincy

Read "History Of The Lisbon Chaplaincy" reviewed by Mark Corroto

It's interesting just how much place influences a recording. Was the session captured in a hermetically sealed studio or a noisy jazz club? Is the sound engineered or merely captured? And how does the architecture of the recording space effect the sound? Sound experimentalist Pauline Oliveros often recorded in an empty water cistern, timing notes against ...

Rosario Bonaccorso: A Beautiful Story

Read "A Beautiful Story" reviewed by Mark Corroto

What does Theodore Roosevelt have do do with jazz? The saying “speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far," is attributed to the American President (1901-1909). What isn't well known is that he borrowed the proverb from West Africa. Which brings us full circle to African Americans, and, of course, jazz. That same ...

The Vampires: The Vampires Meet Lionel Loueke

Read "The Vampires Meet Lionel Loueke" reviewed by Mark Corroto

As we mature as music listeners, the need to select a piece of music as your summer theme song, go-to party album, or road trip recording fades. Just like the childhood requirement to designate who is your best friend, we don't wear the grooves of records out these days. Let's, for old times sake, choose a ...

Greg Duncan & The Individuation Quintet: Unification

Read "Unification" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Let's start at the dénouement. Trumpeter Greg Duncan and his Individuation Quintet close their premier release with “Say Hey," a composition Branford Marsalis wrote for director Spike Lee's 1990 film Mo' Better Blues. The conclusion is a fitting genesis for Duncan's declaration. Just like fellow trumpeter Nate Wooley's refashioning of brother Wynton Marsalis' music on (Dance ...

William Parker Quartets: Meditation / Resurrection

Read "Meditation / Resurrection" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Bassist William Parker's Quartets (note the plural) presented here are, of course just a fraction of the ensembles he is currently organizing and working in. It is these 2 quartets that manifest the Yin and Yang that is Parker. The question might be, is his Quartet of trumpeter Jalalu-Kalvert Nelson, alto saxophonist Rob Brown, and drummer ...

Ivo Perelman, Matthew Shipp, and the Buddha walk in to a bar...

Read "Ivo Perelman, Matthew Shipp, and the Buddha walk in to a bar..." reviewed by Mark Corroto

Ivo Perelman / Matthew Shipp
The Art Of Perelman-Shipp
Leo Records
2017

If you are looking for reviews of the seven new discs Ivo Perelman and Matthew Shipp released on Leo Records, you won't find them here. You probably won't find a proper review of the music elsewhere either, but ...

Albert Ayler Quartet: Copenhagen Live 1964

Read "Copenhagen Live 1964" reviewed by Mark Corroto

It's almost as if the phenomenon that was saxophonist Albert Ayler was just a dream. Nearly fifty years after his death, listeners (and musicians, for that matter) are still catching up to him, and realizing his gift. His life, like that of Charlie Parker, ended at age 34. But where Parker (an originator of bebop) developed ...

Thelonious Monk: Les Liaisons Dangereuses 1960

Read "Les Liaisons Dangereuses 1960" reviewed by Mark Corroto

It's nearly impossible to underestimate the importance of the discovery of the tapes Thelonious Monk made for the French film Les Liasons Dangereuses 1960. Recorded in New York in July 1959, the session, although used in the film, was filed away for some 55 years. Recovered and remastered, we hear not only the soundtrack, but alternate ...


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