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ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

George Wein: A Life and Legend in Jazz

Read "George Wein: A Life and Legend in Jazz" reviewed by Doug Hall

Last summer, in June of 2017, I had the privilege and opportunity to interview George Wein, founder and producer of the seminal Newport Jazz Festival. At 91, he was just in the process of supporting and transitioning the new artistic director Christian McBride into this demanding and critical role for the future of the Newport Jazz ...

Claudia Döffinger: Monochrome

Read "Monochrome" reviewed by Gareth Thompson

The turkey trot and tango became so popular by 1914 that the Vatican saw fit to denounce them. American ballrooms, once invaded by European dance steps, were now throbbing to these sexier moves. In his eminent book, The History Of Jazz, author Ted Gioia argues that such new currents in social dancing also forced a change ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part I

Read "Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part I" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

OriginsBy the second half of the 1920s, New York had supplanted jny: Chicago as the center of jazz. The “Jazz Age"--a label incorrectly ascribed to F. Scott Fitzgerald--could rationally have been framed as the “Dance Age." Prohibition, and the speakeasies that it spawned, were packed with wildly enthusiastic patrons of the jny: Charleston, Black Bottom, Shimmy, ...

Thumbscrew: Theirs

Read "Theirs" reviewed by Mark Corroto

The trio Thumbscrew is releasing simultaneously two recordings from a single session, Theirs and Ours. The first is an album of cover songs and the latter originals by the band. While these reductionist tags might describe the music in its fundamental aspects, these two recordings are the product of one intricate process and trio language.

Dot Time Legends Series: Is Every Night New Year's Eve Around Here?

Read "Dot Time Legends Series: Is Every Night New Year's Eve Around Here?" reviewed by Richard  J Salvucci

Soon after The Embers opened in New York City in late 1951, Joe Bushkin and His Quartet spent 16 memorable weeks there. With Milt Hinton and Jo Jones, Bushkin was joined by Buck Clayton on trumpet. Astoundingly, Art Tatum had a solo piano gig there at the same time. Bushkin and Tatum listened to each other ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Mandla Mlangeni: Born to Be

Read "Mandla Mlangeni: Born to Be" reviewed by Seton Hawkins

Mandla Mlangeni has been engaged. The South African trumpeter, composer, and bandleader oversees three groups, notably the Amandla Freedom Ensemble and the Tune Recreation Committee. Additionally, his works are marked by an intense effort to explore and connect with social discourse in the country today. Indeed, from the Tune Recreation Committee's naming nod to South Africa's ...

NEWS: FESTIVAL

Nice Jazz Festival and Jazz at Juan les Pins 2018

Nice Jazz Festival and Jazz at Juan les Pins 2018

The Cote d'Azur, France's legendary playground, celebrated the first jazz festival 70 years ago but the concept did not become an annual event until the early 1970s. Set beside the impossibly blue Mediterranean, jazz festivals are celebrated all along the coast from Cannes to Monte Carlo. Here we look at two major events in July, Nice ...

Meet Martin McFie

Read "Meet Martin McFie" reviewed by Tessa Souter and Andrea Wolper

Super Fan Martin McFie is so into live music he doesn't even have a record collection. These days, McFie, British by birth, calls both South Carolina and Nice, France, home. The frequent-traveling “jazz detective" has made it his business to seek out jazz of all kinds in some of the most unlikely places, especially when he's ...

Jazz Ambassadors: Representing A Segregated America During The Cold War

Read "Jazz Ambassadors: Representing A Segregated America During The Cold War" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Jazz Ambassadors
THIRTEEN Productions
2018

Here, long overdue, is a comprehensive documentary about the legendary jazz musicians in the 1950s who served as “cultural ambassadors" under the aegis of the U.S. State Department, touring Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Soviet Union. The film comes sixty years after the fact. As Americans continue ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

State and Mainstream: The Jazz Ambassadors and the U.S. State Department

Read "State and Mainstream: The Jazz Ambassadors and the U.S. State Department" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

The Cold War that began in 1947 and ran for forty-four years, had jazz music as its primary deterrent to global tensions, and it did more to foster good will between the U.S. and global citizens than any previous program launched by the U.S. Department of State. Jazz music, even in its Golden Age, was seldom ...