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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Jaimie Branch: Fly Or Die II: Bird Dogs Of Paradise

Read "Fly Or Die II: Bird Dogs Of Paradise" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

Over a relatively short career, the adventurous composer and trumpeter Jaimie Branch has developed a mature and singular style with a politically informed dimension. On her second album as leader, she and her band create tense atmospheres that brim with creativity and spontaneity. The two part “Prayer For Amerikkka" opens with bassist Jason Ajemian's ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Pat Irwin and J. Walter Hawkes: Wide Open Sky

Read "Wide Open Sky" reviewed by Troy Dostert

Multi-instrumentalists Pat Irwin and J. Walter Hawkes are long-established veterans who have practically done it all: they've made numerous television and film soundtracks, played with everyone from Norah Jones to the B-52s and recorded in a wide variety of contexts, too many to name. So when the two finally got together for a Long Island arts ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Dan Weiss Trio Plus 1: Utica Box

Read "Utica Box" reviewed by Troy Dostert

An inventive drummer whose technical facility is easily matched by his compositional ambition, Dan Weiss is not a percussionist to be trifled with. Whether he is offering idiosyncratic homages to some of jazz's foremost rhythm-men, as on his Sixteen: Drummers Suite (Pi Recordings, 2016) or attempting to fuse jazz and prog metal, as on Starebaby (Pi ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Andrew Munsey: High Tide

Read "High Tide" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Known equally for his unconventional timing as well as his audio design and production, drummer/composer/producer Andrew Munsey takes charge of his equally unconventional, decade-long Brooklyn quintet and delivers the assertive and ambitious High Tide. Munsey's nine compositions, alive with sparse grooves and slippery time passages morphing from one odd equation to the next collective ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Jonathon Crompton: Intuit

Read "Intuit" reviewed by Troy Dostert

Although alto saxophonist Jonathon Crompton released a promising album, Faustian Pact, with sax-guitar-drums trio Kinsmen and Strangers, in 2018, he's still a relatively unsung presence in the jazz scene. However, with Intuit, his debut release as a leader, that should change. With consistently provocative compositions that combine rhythmic subtlety, harmonic complexity and a sophisticated command of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter: Radical Invisibilty

Read "Radical Invisibilty" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Always on the farthest fringe of both the downtown New York music scene and the jazz world at large hasn't stopped multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter from leaving an indelible imprint on the greater consciousness. He has worked alongside other mavericks, notably Thurston Moore, Yoko Ono, Cecil Taylor, and Jaco Pastorius. His horns are fiery, disruptive and probing, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

SPAZA: SPAZA

Read "SPAZA" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

SPAZA, the debut from an improvisational collective based in Johannesburg, South Africa, may be the most surprising and gratifying album you hear this year by a group you've never heard of before. (The collective itself happens to be named—you guessed it--SPAZA.) The press materials note that the music was “completely improvised" and that SPAZA is part ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Federico Ughi: Transoceanico

Read "Transoceanico" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

Dozens of jazz albums modeled on trumpeter Miles Davis's Miles Smiles (Columbia, 1966) or saxophonist John Coltrane's Crescent (Impulse!, 1964) get released each year, but a record reminiscent of Albert Ayler's Spiritual Unity (ESP-Disc, 1964) is less common. Drummer Federico Ughi's Transoceanico nods vigorously in Ayler's direction, even as it marks Ughi's twentieth anniversary as a ...

Klezmer: Jewish Jazz? Not really, but sometimes...

Read "Klezmer: Jewish Jazz? Not really, but sometimes..." reviewed by Michael Winograd

I've always found it funny that Klezmer music has often been described as “Jewish Jazz." And I've found it even funnier that the great Klezmer clarinetist Dave Tarras was referred to as “The Jewish Benny Goodman." Right? Its funny. But more so, its fascinating that for many listeners, Jewish and non Jewish alike, there was a ...


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