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ARTICLE: RADIO

The Songbooks (1950 - 1959)

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Songs from what came to be known as the Great American Songbook, have been part of jazz perhaps since The Original Dixieland Jazz Band began recording Irving Berlin compositions. In the 1940s, singer Lee Wiley recorded several collections of 78s, known as “albums"--a name that stuck into the LP era, focused on the work of individual ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Norman Granz and Verve Records (1944 - 1962)

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In July 2, 1944, Norman Granz, a jazz fan and small-time LA promoter staged a concert in the Philharmonic Auditorium with $300 of borrowed money. His “Jazz at the Philharmonic" concerts were hugely successful and became tours that ran until 1957. These tours and the record labels they spawned—Clef, Norgran and especially Verve—became home to many ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

West Coast Piano: Dave Brubeck, Hampton Hawes, Nat King Cole (1944 - 1959)

Read "West Coast Piano: Dave Brubeck, Hampton Hawes, Nat King Cole (1944 - 1959)" reviewed by Russell Perry

In the last hour, we heard from Thelonious Monk, Elmo Hope and Herbie Nichols--three closely associated New York pianists in the 1950s. In this hour, we'll return to the West Coast and another trio of pianists representing some of the widely divergent strains of jazz in the 1950s. Nat “King" Cole was famous first as a ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Monk and Friends: Thelonious Monk, Herbie Nichols, & Elmo Hope in the 1950s (1953 - 1957)

Read "Monk and Friends: Thelonious Monk, Herbie Nichols, & Elmo Hope in the 1950s (1953 - 1957)" reviewed by Russell Perry

The 1950s were a very productive decade for Thelonious Monk, perhaps his most productive as a composer. During the fifties his reputation and impact grew tremendously. His influence on other pianists can be seen in the work of Elmo Hope and Herbie Nichols, among others. Although neither had the longevity or enjoyed the popularity that Monk ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

The Chicago Sound (1956 - 1961)

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Because it acted as a safe harbor for the New Orleans diaspora of the teens and twenties, Chicago played a key role in early jazz. By the 1950s, much of jazz was understood in the dialog between cool jazz and hard bop, aka West Coast and East Coast, with Los Angeles and New York playing inordinately ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

The Lyricists - Benny Golson, Gigi Gryce, Art Farmer (1953 - 1962)

Read "The Lyricists - Benny Golson, Gigi Gryce, Art Farmer (1953 - 1962)" reviewed by Russell Perry

"Musicians of a gentler, more lyrical bent ... found in hard bop a more congenial climate than bebop had offered: for instance, trumpeter Art Farmer, [and] composers Benny Golson and Gigi Gryce.... In a sense, such musicians were not hard boppers at all. They are, however, partially associated with the movement for two reasons. First, they ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Sons of the Jazz Messengers (1956 - 1964)

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In 1956, with Horace Silver's departure, Art Blakey inherited the Jazz Messengers. Over the next five years, the Jazz Messengers took part in recording sessions that have resulted in almost 40 live and studio recordings. Also in this period, Blakey collaborated with players who became the stars of Hard Bop. In this hour, we will hear ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Birth of Hard Bop (1954 - 1958)

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While the “Cool School" was emerging on the West Coast from its roots in Bix and Pres as codified by Miles in The Birth of the Cool sessions of 1949-- 1950, what became known as Hard Bop, a gospel-and blues-influenced variant was growing from Bebop in the east.

Playlist Host Intro 0:00 Miles Davis ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Stan Kenton and West Coast Jazz (1950 - 1958)

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In the last hour, we heard evidence of Woody Herman's capacity for talent development in the form of further work by reed players Stan Getz, Serge Chaloff, Al Cohn, Zoot Sims and Jimmy Giuffre. In this hour we turn the spotlight on alumni of the Stan Kenton Orchestra which produced several significant players in the West ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Cool - Four Brothers After Woody Herman (1946 - 1961)

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Bandleader Woody Herman created a distinctive sound around The Four Brothers -the three tenor plus baritone sax front line of Stan Getz, Zoot Sims, Herbie Stewart (later Al Cohn) and Serge Chaloff--and the writing of clarinetist Jimmy Giuffre. In time, Getz, Sims, Chaloff, Cohn and Giuffre would all become distinctive soloists and all had a role ...