From Far and Wide

An umbrella column, these articles oftentimes defy categorization.

FROM FAR AND WIDE

Refugee Music in Europe: Migration, Asylum, Soundroutes, and Arab Jams

Read "Refugee Music in Europe: Migration, Asylum, Soundroutes, and Arab Jams" reviewed by Arthur R George

World conflicts do not spare musicians. They are among the millions of displaced persons upon the planet. A refugee assistance organization in Europe which has assisted hundreds said an accurate total is impossible to know; one estimate put the number into the thousands. Many had been privileged in their home countries, highly-educated, middle class or more. None of them had planned to become refugees. Their difficulties, for employment, inclusion, cohesion, and preservation of cultures, may be eased by jazz initiatives. ...

FROM FAR AND WIDE

At A Korean Jazz Picnic, No Need To Know The Music

Read "At A Korean Jazz Picnic, No Need To Know The Music" reviewed by Arthur R George

That jazz appeals to younger audiences, is fun, and not so serious, is more than a mere notion, materializing in, of all places, South Korea. The Jarasum Jazz Festival created there by promoter In Jae Jin has become one of the largest in Asia by hosting a multi-day event which features camping, western and Korean performers, and is intended to be so user-friendly he says it is “like a picnic where you do not need to know the music."

FROM FAR AND WIDE

Istanbul Jazz: So Close to the Music, So Far From New York

Read "Istanbul Jazz: So Close to the Music, So Far From New York" reviewed by Arthur R George

That any musician, old cat, young lion, or apprentice anywhere, endeavors in jazz is amazing enough, given the elusiveness of “success." That is even more true in jny: Istanbul, Turkey: not a conventional jazz capitol, far from the African-American roots of jazz, and even beyond the music's major continental domiciles. Yet the tilting cobblestoned streets of the city echo with the music. There is indigenous Turkish music re-interpreted; progressive, experimental, and avant-garde to varying results. However, most dependably ...

FROM FAR AND WIDE

Back to Brazil: Part Three

Read "Back to Brazil: Part Three" reviewed by Mark Holston

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 A singer who needs no introduction, Eliane Elias sculpts a predictably sensual soundscape on Love Stories (Concord). The nine-track project features a string orchestra and lush arrangements by Rob Mathes, unobtrusive rhythm section chores by a cadre of Brazilian percussionists, and the steady hand of bassist Marc Johnson. The slinky French film opening track, “A Man and a Woman," establishes a mood of 1960s-era relaxed romanticism that prevails throughout most ...

FROM FAR AND WIDE

Back to Brazil: Part Two

Read "Back to Brazil: Part Two" reviewed by Mark Holston

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 Part Two of this series on recent Brazilian-influenced releases continues with further discussion of the Samba Jazz genre. The style's heyday, from the early to mid-1960s, produced what Brazilian music critics consider to be landmark recordings. The early champions of the instrumental and more jazz-oriented version of Bossa Nova included such pioneers as pianist Sérgio Mendes and his Bossa Rio Septet; baritone saxophonist Moacir Santos; drummers Dom Um Romão, Milton ...

FROM FAR AND WIDE

Back to Brazil: Part One

Read "Back to Brazil: Part One" reviewed by Mark Holston

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 The recent passing of Brazilian music icon João Gilberto at the age of 88 invites us to reflect on the music revolution he was influential in sparking over six decades ago. The singer and guitarist, partnering with composer Antônio Carlos Jobim, announced the arrival of a distinctly new style with his 1958 recording of Jobim's “Chega de Saudade," and the new Brazilian sound, dubbed Bossa Nova (the “New Thing," among ...

FROM FAR AND WIDE

Polish Jazz: Under The Surface

Read "Polish Jazz: Under The Surface" reviewed by Ian Patterson

The article was originally published in a special English edition of Jazz Forum magazine prepared for Jazzahead! 2018. It was the summer of 2002. A friend had just passed me a copy of Tomasz Stańko's latest CD on ECM—Soul Of Things, and was raving about the young trio backing the legendary trumpeter. In no time, I too was bowled over by the musicianship of Marcin Wasilewski, bassist Sławomir Kurkiewicz and drummer Michał Miśkiewicz—all then in their twenties. The ...


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