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Jesse Byrom-Carter: The Next Tomorrow Is Yesterday

Read "The Next Tomorrow Is Yesterday" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Jesse Byrom-Carter is a young bassist from Australia who has put together a CD that uses several talented players on horns, guitar and vocals to carve a distinctive path within the world of rock, jazz and soul fusions. One of his key collaborators is guitarist Adam Rogers whose distinctive slippery sound slithers through the prog-funk of “As Is" and “The Next Tomorrow Is Yesterday," loosening up their sharp, angular rhythms. “The Next Tomorrow Is Yesterday" is also notable ...

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Chiemi Nakai: Ascendant

Read "Ascendant" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Unleashing her third album as leader, pianist/composer and arranger Chiemi Nakai delivers her best outing to date, melding jazz, the Latin sound and elements of Japanese pop. Containing mostly original compositions from the artist, Nakai also includes a couple of fresh re-arranged jazz standards from Thelonious Monk and Gene De Paul. The Latin tinge is present throughout the music, sprinkling a spicy tone all over the album, and quite nicely at that. Of course, Nakai's musical support ...

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Lisipi: Lisipi

Read "Lisipi" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

The group is called Trio Lisipi; the album is titled an (almost) eponymous Lisipi. The eye-catching album cover features a stylish and attractive young woman sitting at a piano wearing a pair of stiletto heels, bringing Brazil's Eliane Elias to mind. But the woman in the heels is Liliya Akhmetzyanova, a pianist with a Russian conservatory background who has taken up the art of jazz. Trio Lisipi makes its home in Rome, Italy, making jazz that is a ...

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Carrera Quinta: Traslaciones

Read "Traslaciones" reviewed by Jack Bowers

As one would anticipate from the group's name--and the album's song selection--the seven-member Carrera Quinta (pared down from big-band size) plays music from South America, more specifically the Andes region of Colombia, interlaced with mainstream American jazz. The Latin Grammy-nominated ensemble's third album, Traslaciones, comprises seven songs showcasing traditional Colombian styles such as pasillo, bambuco and guabina as part of a research project developed at Universidad El Bosque School of Music in Bogota where all the members of the septet ...

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Ricardo Peixoto: scary beautiful

Read "scary beautiful" reviewed by Nicholas F. Mondello

A well-known chocolate confection advertises itself as “Indescribably Delicious." That phrase also aptly describes guitarist/composer Ricardo Peixoto's album, Scary Beautiful. It is a recording of rainbow textures, infectious energies and utterly superior musicianship. And, it is one that encourages devouring. Peixoto (pronounced pay-sho-to), Brazilian by birth and now residing in L.A., gives us his third--and best--recording to date as leader. As one might expect of a player from such a rich musical and cultural landscape, the effort ...

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Lucinda Belle: Think Big: Like Me

Read "Think Big: Like Me" reviewed by Paul Naser

Oscar nominated singer-songwriter Lucinda Belle isn't the first to do what she does, but she may be among the most eclectic; the vocalist/harpist keeps tradition alive by feeding it with myriad influences. Though her vocal style and choice of instrumentation often suggest jazz, she reaches well beyond the idiom while staying true to its roots. Her most recent offering, Think Big: Like Me pulls from jazz, pop, reggae, doo-wop, R&B and hip-hop, among other styles, to create an engaging pastiche ...

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Okan Ersan: Nibiru

Read "Nibiru" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Guitarist Okan Ersan hails from Cyprus and was a featured soloist on his younger bassist brother Oytun Ersan's album Fusiolicious (Self Produced, 2019). On the outer space-inspired concept album Nibiru (named after the mythical planet) his jazz fusion quartet cooks a quite a solar storm. Each of the seven chapters charts a musical narrative related to its respective celestial theme. The album also incorporates some NASA space samples as heard at the start of the opener “Chapter I: 6EQUJ5 (Wow ...

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Seth Yacovone: Old Canada

Read "Old Canada" reviewed by Doug Collette

Anyone who's seen guitarist/composer Seth Yacovone perform his weekly solo acoustic gigs at the fabled Burlington venue Nectar's knows full well of his admiration of the work of Bob Dylan and Neil Young. And the most avid followers of his peripatetic activities have also most likely attended his regular tributes to the Canadian rock icon's work with Crazy Horse and/or his annual recognition of the Nobel Laureate's birthday. The impulsive natures Yacovone, Dylan and Young share may be ...

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Charlie Ballantine: Cold Coffee

Read "Cold Coffee" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Indianapolis-born jazz guitarist/composer Charlie Ballantine has a special relationship with American music of all kinds: jazz, folk, the blues (his father was a blues guitarist, providing some of Ballantine's earliest musical memories) and contemporary rock. His previous album Life Is Brief: The Music Of Bob Dylan (Green Mind Records, 2018) made the inspiration outside of jazz clear, and previous covers had included songs by Leonard Cohen, Tom Waits and the Pixies. This album--a trio with long-time band-mates bassist ...

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Ill Considered: 6

Read "6" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

The London-based quartet, Ill Considered, has churned out nine full-length albums in less than two years, each high quality and each a unique jazz creation. Founded in 2017, saxophonist Idris Rahman, drummer Emre Ramazanoglu and bassist Leon Brichard replaced their additional percussionist with Satin Singh on their second release, Live at the Crypt (Self Produced, 2017). Rahman and Brichard had recorded in a short-lived group called Wildflower; that trio bearing more than a passing similarity to the style of this ...

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Chris Greene: PlaySCAPE

Read "PlaySCAPE" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Saxophonist Chris Greene's twelfth recording is a solid hard bop affair, an appointed EP, that begins intensely and never gives up. The angular, “Blues for Dr. Fear" kicks things off, funky and sharp-edged. Greene plays as much Michael Brecker as Hank Mobley squeezing every bit of grease from this extralean music. “Thunder Snow" is mid-1960s Joe Henderson swing, Greene jousting with drummer Steve Corley. Things descend (or ascend, if you will) to the realm of John Coltrane's classic quartet. And ...

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Sivan Arbel: Change of Light

Read "Change of Light" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Sivan Arbel is a young singer with an angelic, elastic tone and the ability to write songs that marry contemplative lyrics to surging melodies with impressive power. Most of her songs use a wide range of sound dynamics, beginning softly with just voice and piano but slowly gathering force and instruments for a big, stormy climax where the musicians scream alongside the soaring passion of Arbel's singing. Many of her works follow that pattern. “Omri" begins as a ...