Articles

Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

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Album Review

Mike Cooper: Oh Really!? / Do I Know You? / Trout Steel / Places I know / The Machine Gun Co. With Mike Cooper

Read "Oh Really!? / Do I Know You? / Trout Steel / Places I know / The Machine Gun Co. With Mike Cooper" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard


“Riverboat captain, they called my name / Time to sing my song / I didn't know that the song was wrong / Don't sing that way again." These lyrics from the song “Trout Steel" are penned by guitarist, singer and songwriter, Mike Cooper, and they point directly to the iconoclastic nature of his art. While he is often conveniently pigeonholed as a blues guitarist, Cooper is so much more, and he often sings the “wrong" songs, venturing ...

5

Album Review

Caldera: Caldera / Sky Islands

Read "Caldera / Sky Islands" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard


Mention the word “fusion" and a list of familiar names often turns up: Miles Davis, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams' Lifetime, Return to Forever and Weather Report. But what about Caldera? Aficionados of the genre will probably know about them but, to many listeners, they will be a new discovery and, thanks to a BGO reissue of their first two albums on Capitol, it's now possible to take a deeper look at the group that emerged at the height ...

10

Album Review

Pamela Polland: Pamela Polland / Have You Heard The One About The Gas Station Attendant?

Read "Pamela Polland / Have You Heard The One About The Gas Station Attendant?" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard


The singer-songwriter movement of the seventies paved the way for several new voices in popular music, but not everyone got the success of Carole King, whose album Tapestry (Ode, 1971) marked a peak in the movement, commercially and artistically. Pamela Polland was one of the artists whom fame eluded. Polland was poised for a big breakthrough with a record contract for CBS and the staunch support of label president, Clive Davis. However, things didn't turn out as planned. ...

49

Album Review

Steve Khan: Public Access / Headline / Crossings

Read "Public Access / Headline / Crossings" reviewed by John Kelman


It's been a great couple of years for Steve Khan fans who are (relatively) new to the guitarist's work, especially his early releases, thanks to UK-based BGO Records. First, his '70s-era trio of fusion-centric LPs on Columbia Records, 1977's Tightrope, 1978's The Blue Man and 1979's Arrows, were remastered and reissued in a 2015 two-CD set, Tightrope / The Blue Man / Arrows. As fine as those records are, however, BGO's 2016 reissue of Khan's early '80s triptych, which has ...

2

Album Review

Milt Jackson: Sunflower / Goodbye

Read "Sunflower / Goodbye" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard


Even if vibes player Milt Jackson had just played with The Modern Jazz Quartet and not embarked on a solo career, his place in jazz history would be secure. However, Jackson was much more than a vital part of the famous chamber jazz group and he recorded a string of excellent albums, including three sessions as a leader for Creed Taylor's label, CTI. Two of those albums are now conveniently gathered in a single-disc package from British ...

2

Album Review

Charlie Rich: Every Time You Touch Me (I Get High) / Silver Linings / Take Me / Rollin' With The Flow

Read "Every Time You Touch Me (I Get High) / Silver Linings / Take Me / Rollin' With The Flow" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard


There is an anecdote about the legendary singer Elvis Presley, who walked into the office of Sun Records to do an audition. He was asked by receptionist Marion Keisker what kind of singer he was and Presley answered: “I sing all kinds." The same could be said about another Sun Records-affiliate, the pianist, composer and singer, Charlie Rich. Rich never got as famous as Presley, even though he was just as talented, but he released a steady ...

5

Album Review

Arthur Blythe: Lenox Avenue Breakdown / In The Tradition / Illusions / Blythe Spirit

Read "Lenox Avenue Breakdown / In The Tradition / Illusions / Blythe Spirit" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard


Jazz-reissues are important because they help to write and rewrite jazz-history. Through reissues, the prominence of an artist is maintained and the canon is confirmed, but it can also be questioned and corrected. A double-disc from the excellent reissue label, BGO, brings four key records from leader and alto saxophonist, Arthur Blythe, back into circulation. The records, all released on Columbia, are: Lenox Avenue Breakdown (1979), In The Tradition (1980), Illusions (1980) and Blythe Spirit (1981). The ...


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