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Misha Tsiganov: Playing With The Wind

Read "Playing With The Wind" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Pianist Misha Tsiganov seems to further his creative reach with each date he delivers. While calculation and supreme specificity with the pen always help to keep things grounded in his music, the level of daring in Tsiganov's compositions and the high degree of spontaneity he brings to the fore through his piano help to continually push things one step beyond. With The Artistry Of The Standard (Criss Cross, 2014), Tsiganov elevated the act of interpretation and demonstrated ...

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Noah Preminger: Genuinity

Read "Genuinity" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Quite often when an über-talented musician records a disc under his own name, he uses sidemen of lesser talent so as not to detract from his moment in the limelight, or because his ego won't allow him to play nice. That has never been the case with saxophonist Noah Preminger. On Genuinity, his tenth disc released as a leader, Preminger employs partners of equal weight. Listening to the saxophonist and trumpeter Jason Palmer reminds you of the Sonny Rollins/Don Cherry ...

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Alex Sipiagin: Moments Captured

Read "Moments Captured" reviewed by Andrew Luhn

Trumpeter Alex Sipiagin's 12th outing as a leader for the esteemed Criss Cross label finds him returning to the three-horn front line format that he previously explored on the masterful “Destinations Unknown" (Criss Cross, 2011). Returning from that date are tenor giant Chris Potter and the unrelentingly groovy Eric Harland on drums. David Binney is Sipiagin's usual choice of alto players, (having appeared on three of his previous releases,) however this time around Will Vinson completes the horn section on ...

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John Swana: Bright Moments

Read "Bright Moments" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Simply put, this album is so listenable and stood out so noticeably among the many CDs I've been spinning for myself recently, that I thought All About Jazz readers ought to know about it. I first heard then trumpeter John Swana a decade or more ago when he jammed at pianist Tom Lawton's memorable long-term gig with the late great bassist Al Stauffer at the Four Seasons Hotel in Philadelphia. I was awestruck by Swana's clarity, sustained non-vibrato tone, and ...

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David Binney: The Time Verses

Read "The Time Verses" reviewed by Geannine Reid

Acclaimed as a significant and extremely unique compositional talent, saxophonist David Binney is one of the most prolific jazz musicians on the scene today. Binney has created an alternative jazz scene that focuses on playing adventurous and original music, which has been key to his journey as a player. He possesses a distinctive saxophone sound and has an extensive catalog as a leader, in addition to being sought after as a sideman, appearing on record with: Medeski, Martin & Wood, ...

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Matt Brewer: Unspoken

Read "Unspoken" reviewed by Andrew Luhn

Bassist Matt Brewer first revealed his talents as a bandleader and a composer on his 2014 Criss Cross debut Mythology. Brewer returns to the Criss Cross label for his sophomore effort with a completely new quintet to explore seven new original compositions, a Bill Frisell cover, and one Charlie Parker tune. Joining him this time around are tenor saxophonist Ben Wendel, guitarist Charles Altura, pianist Aaron Parks, and drummer Tyshawn Sorey, all of whom have previously recorded as sidemen for ...

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Seamus Blake / Chris Cheek: Let's Call the Whole Thing Off

Read "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Friends and musical collaborators for more than two decades, New York tenor saxophonists Seamus Blake and Chris Cheek have been leaders, sidemen and big band soloist throughout their distinguished careers and seem to cherish their roles as co-leaders on joint projects such as their critically-acclaimed Reeds Ramble (Criss Cross Jazz, 2014). Let's Call the Whole Thing Off is their follow up album bringing together the same quintet they call Reeds Ramble which include pianist Ethan Iverson, bassist Matt Penman and ...

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Conrad Herwig / Igor Butman: Reflections

Read "Reflections" reviewed by Andrew Luhn

"Tight" is the word that most readily comes to mind to describe this band's playing. For Reflections, his tenth release as a leader for the Dutch Criss Cross label, trombonist Conrad Herwig has joined forces with Russian tenor man Igor Butman as co-leader. Rounding out the front-line is trumpeter extraordinaire Alex Sipiagin, a name that will be very familiar to anyone who keeps up with Criss Cross releases. The music on this disc, beautifully recorded and mixed by Michael Marciano, ...

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Misha Tsiganov: Spring Feelings

Read "Spring Feelings" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Russian-born pianist extraordinaire Misha Tsiganov delivers his second album and follow up to his highly-acclaimed Criss Cross Jazz label debut The Artistry of The Standard, with the thoroughly enthralling and enchanting Spring Feelings presenting a superb selection of five outrages originals and four reimagined standards in one exquisite package of post-bop burners. Before recoding the label debut, Tsiganov realized he had so much material available that it could not actually fit in one album and therefore suggested that Artistry should ...

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Misha Tsiganov: Spring Feelings

Read "Spring Feelings" reviewed by Andrew Luhn

Those who appreciate and follow the art of arranging and orchestration in jazz often point to big band and large ensemble arrangements as examples of excellence, while the art of arranging jazz for the small ensemble is frequently overlooked. Horace Silver, Wayne Shorter, and Andrew Hill are a few who have achieved recognition for their intelligent small-group arrangements, and with his newest release, Spring Feelings, pianist Misha Tsiganov brings his talent to this under-appreciated art. For his second ...

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The Rodriguez Brothers: Impromptu

Read "Impromptu" reviewed by Andrew Luhn

Those of us who have siblings know the special bond that brothers and sisters share. From being able to quote the same movies, to sharing memories of childhood and growing up, it's hard to deny that siblings have a unique connection. It should come as no surprise then, that this unique connection gives siblings a certain advantage when playing music together, especially music as intimate and conversational as jazz. Indeed, there is a rich history of brothers collaborating in jazz; ...

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Tim Warfield: Spherical: Dedicated to Thelonious Sphere Monk

Read "Spherical: Dedicated to Thelonious Sphere Monk" reviewed by Andrew Luhn

Thelonious Monk tribute albums are certainly nothing new in the jazz world. As early as 1961, Eddie “Lockjaw" Davis and Johnny Griffin recorded Lookin' at Monk and pianist Bud Powell recorded Portrait of Thelonious. Even while his career was still going strong, Monk's importance as a composer and influence on other jazz musicians was already clear. Today Monk's legendary status as one of jazz's most important figures is still clear. As far as I know, there is no hard data ...


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