Articles

Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

ALBUM REVIEWS

Yazz Ahmed: Polyhymnia

Read "Polyhymnia" reviewed by Chris May

The British-Bahraini trumpeter, flugelhornist and composer Yazz Ahmed went clear in 2017 with La Saboteuse (Naim). The album is an otherworldly mix of jazz, electronics and Arabic folk music which carries traces of Miles Davis' In A Silent Way (Columbia, 1969) and Bitches Brew (Columbia, 1970) and Jon Hassell's Dream Theory In Malaya: Fourth World Volume 2 (E.G., 1981), all wrapped in a modern sensibility. With it, Ahmed outstripped Ibrahim Maalouf as the high priest of psychedelic Arabic jazz.

ALBUM REVIEWS

Ramsey Lewis & Urban Knights: VII

Read "VII" reviewed by Phillip Woolever

Back in 1995, an executive named Carl Griffin at Ramsey Lewis' record label reportedly conceived the idea of forming a jazz “super group" around the well-established Chicago pianist. The resulting all-star project, deemed Urban Knights, featured Grover Washington Jr. and a rhythm section with Omar Hakim and bassist Victor Bailey, who'd worked together in the early '80s lineup of Weather Report. On five subsequent albums over the next quarter century, a rotating Urban Knights cast has showcased famous players and ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

The Adam Larson Band: Listen With Your Eyes

Read "Listen With Your Eyes" reviewed by Phillip Woolever

Adam Larson may hail initially from Normal (Illinois), but there is absolutely nothing typical or average, in terms of style or ability, about the now-Kansas-City-based saxophonist. He has gathered a trio with comparable strengths and, behind his towering tenor, they create a showcase of prime progressive jazz. The ride begins with “Sleepers," a shape-shifting opener with nothing drowsy about it which flows through multiple motifs. Larson soars across impressively unique arrangements into segmented duets between pianist Fabian Almazan ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Mike Clark: Indigo Blue Live at the Iridium

Read "Indigo Blue Live at the Iridium" reviewed by Phillip Woolever

Mike Clark has basically spent the entire seven decades of his life keeping the beat, including over fifty years of drumming with the best musicians in the business. Thus it should be no surprise that this project features a quintet that measures up to damn near anybody. Many aficionados share the opinion that live jazz is the art form's ultimate format. This assembly of awesome action makes that position hard to dispute, with a powerful performance package in ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

David Sanchez: Carib

Read "Carib" reviewed by Friedrich Kunzmann

Puerto Rican Saxophonist David Sanchez belongs to the most prolific jazz musicians of the past twenty to thirty years. Not that the quality of his output suffers from the frequency of publications. Beyond his own highly praised recordings, he is recognized for his contributions to groups led by the likes of Kenny Barron, Pat Metheny and late Roy Hargrove, to name only a few. Grammy nominated for a variety of different projects and having won the Latin Grammy in the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jared Pauley: On Capitol Street

Read "On Capitol Street" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Hailing from Charleston, West Virginia, but now resident in NYC, Jared Pauley's first musical experiments were with the guitar but he abandoned this in favor of piano as a teenager. His influences include Herbie Hancock, George Duke and Chick Corea and his first purchased albums were Miles Davis' Milestones (Columbia, 1958), Herbie Hancock's Headhunters (Columbia, 1973) and Tito Puente's Éxitos Eternos (Universal, 2004). Certainly the Corea and Puente influences are prevalent on this follow-up to his debut recording Systematic (Circle ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah: Ancestral Recall

Read "Ancestral Recall" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

It's rare to see Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah's name without some derivation of “architect" affixed to it. It's appropriate. The New Orleans trumpeter and composer—like his peers Kamasi Washington and Ambrose Akinmusire—is part of a wave of jazz musicians determined to keep the genre's momentum moving forward. Adjuah's Ancestral Recall seeks to dismiss notions of identity-based music, with a more inclusive form. As if to demonstrate comprehensiveness, Adjuah opens the collection with a very busy “Her Arrival." Featuring ...


ENGAGE!

Enter our contest giveaways

Contest Giveaways

Enter our contests with a single button click and win a chance at albums or concert tickets.

Contest Guidelines

Reader's Poll: It's your festival. Who do you book?

Fantasy Festival Poll

It's your festival, you're in charge of booking and you have an unlimited budget. Share your lineup.

More Polls

Super search project underway

Publisher's Desk

Stay current on website improvements, new features, handy tips, and more.

MORE POSTS | YEAR IN REVIEW

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.