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Ernesto Rodrigues / Abdul Moimême / Antez: Magma

Read "Magma" reviewed by Mark Corroto

The question that lingers over Magma, by the trio of violist Ernesto Rodrigues, guitarist Abdul Moimême and percussionist Richard Antez, is whether the artists were conscious of the visual aspects created by their music. Of our five senses—taste, sight, touch, smell and sound—it is, of course, the perception of sound that we attribute to music. This is not about the observation of musicians going about their performance as much as the visuals created by the sound itself. Only the audience ...

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Patrick Brennan / Abdul Moimême: Terraphonia

Read "Terraphonia" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Somewhere on a timeline that includes studying guitar in Madrid and architecture in Boston, Portuguese native Abdul Moimême studied saxophone with American artist Patrick Brennan. Moimême has been prolific as part of almost two-dozen leader/co-leader releases since his debut Nekhephthu (Creative Sources, 2008). Brennan is lightly recorded with four leader dates over the past two decades. What they have in common is a penchant for free improvisation and unusual constructs, physical and aural. Terraphonia is the pair's first recorded collaboration. ...

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Dissection Room: Albert Cirera / Abdul Moimême / Alvaro Rosso: Dissection Room

Read "Dissection Room" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

An international trio, based out of Lisbon, Portugal, Dissection Room formed in 2015 with saxophonist Albert Cirera, bassist Alvaro Rosso and guitarist and electronic artist Abdul Moiméme. The three artists share wide-ranging formal training in multiple disciplines as well as an affinity for experimental music. Their self-titled debut, recorded live at Lisbon's O'Culto Da Ajuda in late 2017, is both abstract and experimental and not at all for the faint of heart. A native of the Catalan region ...

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Miguel Angelo: I Think I'm Going To Eat Dessert

Read "I Think I'm Going To Eat Dessert" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Miguel Angelo is a Portuguese bassist whose main occupation is keeping the beat going for other musicians in various groups. If playing in bands is his “bread and butter" job, then it follows that a solo bass recording would be his “dessert."For most of this effort, Angelo plucks and bows with a deep, resonant tone that has little embellishment. He presents a rich and profound pizzicato sound on pieces such as “I have a dream," “Never and never ...

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Miguel Angelo: I Think I’m Going To Eat Dessert

Read "I Think I’m Going To Eat Dessert" reviewed by Troy Dostert

In addition to his numerous sideman appearances, Portuguese bassist Miguel Ângelo has released a couple quartet albums under his own name: Branco (2013) and A Vida de X (2016), both of which possess a strong tuneful vitality. Although the format is very different, Ângelo's decision to release a solo-bass recording this time around does make sense, as it's characterized by the prominent melodies and emotionally resonant playing found in abundance on those previous albums. From the first moments ...

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Miguel Angelo: I Think I’m Going To Eat Dessert

Read "I Think I’m Going To Eat Dessert" reviewed by Mark Corroto

We can all agree that music is perceived and enjoyed through the sensory faculty known as hearing. Certainly, but a musical performance is enhanced when an additional sense is summoned, like the visual when attending a production. In the case of this solo performance by bassist Miguel Ângelo, that additional sense is touch. With I Think I'm Going To Eat Dessert, sound is just one element that is shared equally with the sensation of touch. Ângelo can be ...

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Per Gärdin/Pedro Lopes/Rodrigo Pinheiro: History Of The Lisbon Chaplaincy

Read "History Of The Lisbon Chaplaincy" reviewed by Mark Corroto

It's interesting just how much place influences a recording. Was the session captured in a hermetically sealed studio or a noisy jazz club? Is the sound engineered or merely captured? And how does the architecture of the recording space effect the sound? Sound experimentalist Pauline Oliveros often recorded in an empty water cistern, timing notes against the ping-pong reverberations. The trio of Per Gärdin, Pedro Lopes, and Rodrigo Pinheiro recorded with what can only be described as their fourth member, ...


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