All About Jazz

Home » Articles | Reviews Only

Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

Articles | Featured | Future

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Better Than TV: Song From No Man's Land

Read "Song From No Man's Land" reviewed by

The children on this album's cover are shown enjoying a timeless street game. Such kids often play by their own rules--much like adult musicians, as Better Than TV proves here. A collective from Cambridge, UK, the band is led by bassist Sergio Contrino, whose Italian heritage finds an outlet on this eclectic disc. Song From No Man's Land is aptly titled, with elements of klezmer, cabaret, Nordic dance and Dixie all merging into the jazz framework. Cassie Gorman's ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Mica Bethea: Suite Theory

Read "Suite Theory" reviewed by

If nothing else is known about Mica Bethea, it should be clearly understood that he has never been one to brush aside or turn away from a challenge. When Bethea was twenty-one years old and a student / musician at the University of North Florida, a horrendous auto accident left him a quadriplegic. For most people, that would be the end of the story. For Bethea, it was more like the beginning. No longer able to play an instrument, he ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Andrew Dickeson: Is That So?

Read "Is That So?" reviewed by

Growing up in Australia, Andrew Dickeson played several instruments before deciding on the drums when he was 10. Over the years he developed his intuition and sensitivity, the dynamics helping create a wellspring of skills. His artistry took him to the finals of the Thelonious Monk Institute International Jazz Drums Competition in 1992 where he was the only non-American. Later, he went on to play with Martin Taylor, Lee Konitz, Mark Murphy and Branford Marsalis among others. Dickeson ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Roy McGrath: Remembranzas

Read "Remembranzas" reviewed by

Honoring special memories of the past, Chicago-based Puerto Rico-born tenor saxophonist Roy Mcgrath presents a light Latin-styled session on Remembranzas, featuring eight new compositions, including a special tribute to Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos. A fixture in Chicago's music scene, Mcgrath has led various groups performing jazz, funk, Latin and Salsa. While the leader is firmly established in the jazz scene as a traditional musician, he draws on his Latin heritage for this recording. As ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Tom Wheatley: Double Bass

Read "Double Bass" reviewed by

With improvising double bassists of the calibre of Olie Brice, John Edwards, Dominic Lash, David Leahy, Peter Marsh, Marcio Mattos, Jordan Muscatello and Guillaume Viltard being regulars on the London improv scene, it is not an easy place for young newcomers to make an impression and gain a reputation. But every once in a while, a new bassist comes along who impresses fellow bassists and other musicians equally. Tom Wheatley is the latest such player, having rapidly progressed from being ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Carl Bartlett, Jr.: Promise!

Read "Promise!" reviewed by

Winner of the USA 2015-16 International Songwriting Competition Jazz Category, Carl Bartlett Jr. showcases his skills on PROMISE!. The album's warm, vivacious compositions offer plenty of cheer and good feelings. The result is guaranteed to bring a Billy Higgins smile to your face. Bartlett's alto sax playing is equally sunny. Like Bobby Watson or Donald Harrison, he offers strong and graceful phrases that slip and slide through the songs in clever and fascinating ways. Not to be outdone, ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Noa Fort: No World Between Us

Read "No World Between Us" reviewed by

With No World Between Us, pianist, composer, and vocalist Noa Fort makes her leader debut in an album of comforting originality on all fronts. Her voice, in addition to its well-rounded intonation and emotional integrity, finds equal partnership in lyrics brimming with timeless themes. What separates her soul searching from those before her, however, is a suspension of self between past and future trajectories. By these she slows the here and now to a level at which it may be ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

The Mica Bethea Big Band: Suite Theory

Read "Suite Theory" reviewed by

In 2005 Mica Bethea was studying music at the University of Northern Florida when he was involved in a serious traffic accident that left him a quadriplegic. That ended his being able to play any musical instruments so instead he threw his energies into learning composition and arrangement. He has released two previous albums of music by his big band but this one contains his most autobiographical work, a suite dealing with his life before and after the accident.

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Peripheral Vision: More Songs About Error And Shame

Read "More Songs About Error And Shame" reviewed by

More Songs About Error And Shame by Toronto's Peripheral Vision offers sophisticated, melodic modern jazz with an esoteric bent and eclectic tastes. Co-founders Michael Herring and Don Scott are joined by Nick Fraser on drums and Trevor Hogg on tenor sax in seven original tracks that combine elements of contemporary jazz with a garage band vibe and a groovy Sixties flavor of cool that includes swinging guitars and a strong rhythmic pulse. With tracks titles like “And the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Peripheral Vision: More Songs About Error And Shame

Read "More Songs About Error And Shame" reviewed by

The Juno Award-nominated jazz quartet, Peripheral Vision, delivers a spontaneous set of modernistic music on More Songs About Error And Shame. The sound has a live-in-the-studio freshness, with studio tweakings to embellish their forward-leaning approach. The group's appraoch is a brash and metallic, a mesh of the teaming of Trevor Hogg's sharp toned tenor sax with the luminescence of Don Scott's resonant electric guitar. The Canadian quartet shares a decade-long history of live performance that translates to a ...