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Articles | Featured | Future

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Yoshie Fruchter: Schizophonia: Cantorial Recordings Reimagined

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A stalwart of New York City's astoundingly creative Judaic music scene, multi-instrumentalist and composer Yoshie Fruchter specializes in one thing: moving on from what he's already accomplished. Though he has two genre-smashing albums of edgy, Judaic jazz- rock-prog fusion on John Zorn's Tzadik label under his belt (Blasphemy and Other Serious Crimes, Tzadik Records, 2011, and the now out-of-print Pitom, Tzadik Records, 2008), Fruchter has also contributed his talents to several of Zorn's projects, and an array of unlikely hyphenated ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jake Marmer: Hermeneutic Stomp

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Jake Marmer is an observant jew, poet, and dedicated scholar of beat poetry, the blues, and jazz legacy. He was born in Ukraine, emigrated to New York with a short time in between in Jerusalem, Israel. His poetry, perceived by himself as a work in progress, borrows colorful images from Jewish Talmudic texts and Chassidic chants, improvised and charged by the accompanying musicians and then spun instantly into reflections and innuendos, even ironic zen riddles, spiced with references to “the ...