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Articles by Patrick Burnette

RADIO

Iron Men

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We end 2018 with a bang as the podcast celebrates its sixth--or iron--anniversary. Did you give your significant other a rose dipped in metal for your sixth? If you didn't, shame on you! Get dipping--it's never too late. As per usual at these shindigs, we discuss groups comprised of the number of musicians that the anniversary is -er, sextets, in this case. Happy New Year! Playlist Discussion of Lester Young's Kansas City Six recordings from the thirties on ...

RADIO

Roy, We Hardly Knew Ye

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Roy Hargrove's loss this year was especially difficult on the jazz community, so Pat and Mike devote a whole episode to his work. We didn't get to his electric period in this one, but look at three acoustic leader dates as well as an album where he takes the “Miles" slot in a Herbie Hancock led tribute group. We also peek in on his contributions to D'Angelo's influential album Voodoo. Musings about the young lions movement, nineties style jazz production, ...

RADIO

Ain't Nothin' in Chicago for a Monkey Bastard to Do

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Mike is from the Chicago-land area, Pat spent his salad days in Hyde Park--maybe the bastards are a bit biased, but they love talking about the Windy City. It doesn't hurt that it has a long, noble, somewhat left-of-center history concerning jazz. Anyway, this time they explore the work of a couple of tenor titans, little-known outside of the Midwest, along with an out-jazz supergroup and a jazz vocalist who is very well-known indeed. Quick look-ins at Father John Misty's ...

RADIO

Rock the Casbah of Love

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Before the boys get to two releases hot off the presses, they spend some time with a Steve Kuhn release recorded soon after he parted ways with Art Farmer and started dating Monica Zetterlund. Then it's on to a fairly “out" recording by a veteran reed player and a less world-music-than-it-sounds release from a bass clarinetist with a Coltrane fixation. The episode wraps things up with an in-depth look at Paul Anka's transformation of rock standards into mid-sixties ...

RADIO

Chillin' or Bernin'

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We start this installment by looking at two artists confronting the jazz doldrums in the nineteen seventies and early eighties, then move on to two brand new releases by artists dealing with tradition in different ways, whether the small group classics of the fifties and sixties or the big band legacy. Talk about Lloyd Cole, Stephin Merritt and Andrew Bird rounds out the pop matters segment. Playlist Discussion of Pat Martino's album Starbright (Warner Brothers) 6:00 Discussion of ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Javon Jackson: For You

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Tenor saxophonist Javon Jackson has roots stretching back to the hard-bop forebearers, having served stints with Art Blakey, Freddie Hubbard, Cedar Walton, and other luminaries of the lineage. For You is his twentieth release as a leader, and it finds him paying homage to Hubbard ("My Man Hubbard"), McCoy Tyner ("88 Strong"), Pharoah Sanders ("Mr. Sanders"--though really, the vibe is more great-quartet era of John Coltrane than Sanders), and Walton (two tunes by the pianist: “Simple Pleasure" and “Holy Land"). ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Paula Matthusen: Between Systems and Grounds

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A quick glance at the personnel and tracks for this album will warn you: jazz, this ain't. Indeed, music, arguably, this ain't. Rather, Between Systems and Grounds is a set of elaborately generated, minimalist soundscapes that were part, apparently, of art installations at various institutions. The press materials focus on the process more than the product: “each iteration and performance, integrat[es] field recordings, radio signals, feedback, and a system of cues that all contribute to the slowly-growing textile. The textile ...

RADIO

Weston Culture

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Inspired by Randy Weston's passing, Mike and Pat explore four pivotal albums from the pianist/composer's long career, taking in works from 1960 to 2003. Weston's collaboration with trombonist/arranger Melba Liston is discussed in some depth, as her contributions were crucial to some of his greatest recordings. Pat laments not including Weston's album Highlife from 1963, which he says is his favorite of Weston's collaborations with Liston, while Mike explains the religious origins of “Blue Moses." Playlist Discussion of Randy Weston's ...

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Let's Get Experimental

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Violinist, composer, singer, and poet Sarah Bernstein visits the 'cast to discuss her career in music, her various on-going groups and projects, and her recording with percussionist Satoshi Takeishi, Crazy Lights Shining. The rest of the program explores various kinds of “experimental music," from drummer Rudy Royston's unusual front-line of bass clarinet and accordion to Thrainn Hjalmarsson's.. well, we aren't sure just what Thrainn was up to, but it sure was experimental. Playlist Interview with Sarah Bernstein about ...

RADIO

Cardigans Off!

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Special guest Keri Johnsrud enlivens the first part of the podcast as we discuss her career in music and new collaboration with pianist Kevin Barnes, Welcome to the Neighborhood, an album devoted to the music of one Mr. Fred Rogers. Mike investigates as to whether Fred really served as a Green Beret in 'Nam because you can count on the Jazz Bastard to ask the hard-hitting questions. The rest of the show is devoted to vocal albums with at least ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

John Petrucelli: Presence

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Tenor-saxophonist John Petrucelli's Presence is an ambitious sprawl of an album. Petrucelli features a jazz quintet (with piano, bass, guitar and drums) together with a string quartet, then gives his tunes titles like “Field of Heaven," “Garden of Angels," and “Scallop Shell of Quiet," as if to warn the listener that the album carries more conceptual weight than the average blowing session. The vaguely Sun Ra-ish cover art is another indicator, and the 82 minute running time is a big ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Gadadu: Outer Song

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Look at the personnel for Brooklyn-based group Gadadu and you might be misled into thinking it's a jazz-based outfit--two (count 'em) horn players listed as full members and not an electric guitar in sight. But Gadadu (which sounds a little bit like a martial art for babies) is, at heart, a pop group, albeit one fond of long, winding songs that morph several times in their four to seven minute running-times. Hannah Selin's dreamy, floaty, multi-tracked vocals are the center ...