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Articles by Patrick Burnette

RADIO

Ice, Ice, Baby

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Mike's apparently random picks for this episode, whose release dates range from the mid-fifties to this very year, turn out to have at least one aspect in common: the artists involved illustrate different aspects of “cool." After detours exploring Michel Petrucciani's personal life and Mike's beef with British jazz critics, we wind things up by discussing a classic release from folkster Gillian Welch in our pop matters segment. Playlist Discussion of The Necks's album ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Chicago Jazz Festival 2018

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Chicago Jazz Festival Chicago, IL August 29-September 2, 2018 A Beginner's Guide to the Chicago Jazz Festival The Chicago Jazz Festival is a free event scheduled each Labor Day weekend and offering over fifty concerts in various outdoor venues. The 40th edition--running from August 29 to September 3, 2018--is now in the books. If you attended this year--or in recent years past--you already have a pretty good idea whether or not the Chicago Jazz ...

RADIO

Come Up to the Fender

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It's a mixed-bag this fortnight, with two brand new releases by up and comers (Sasha Mashin and Hubert DuPont), a theme album by a Spanish guitar-slinger, and one of many attempts to turn the jazzy music of Steely Dan into full-blown jazz. Pop matters features brief discussions of British odd-ball musicians Brian Eno and Syd Barrett, only one of whom was crazy like a fox (as opposed to just plain crazy). Playlist Discussion of the Justin Morell Quintet's ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Michel Legrand: Legrand Jazz

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Michel LeGrand is best known for his long and fruitful career in movie soundtracks, but as a young man in 1958 he was featured in an arranger's showcase with a collection of jazz masters, including Ben Webster, John Coltrane, Bill Evans, and Miles Davis. Columbia Records in 1958 had an unparalleled roster to offer the young French phenom; the label also had the studio chops to make the result an audiophile treasure sixty years later (Impex Records reissued ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Shamie Royston: Beautiful Liar

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Shamie Royston has played with Tia Fuller, Ralph Peterson, Sean Jones, and Terri Lynn Carrington, so her credentials are well up to spec, but the glamour-shot artwork and album title ("Beautiful Liar," at least to this writer, suggests a quiet-storm vibe) might lead one to assume that Royston's second date as a leader is an overly-polished recording from the lighter side of the spectrum. Don't be fooled: Beautiful Liar is an exceptionally accomplished and engaging post-bop album. It's beautifully recorded ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Nylon Strings and Other Things: Albums by Jean Chaumont and Kreisberg/Veras

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Nylon-string acoustic guitars don't crop up in jazz all that often, but when they do the results can be delightful. Below I discuss two very different albums which incorporate that distinctive sound. The Beauty of Differences Misfitme 2018 Jean Chaumont's album The Beauty of Differences bogs down in the middle in an unfortunate burst of worthy-mindedness but is otherwise entertaining and full of promise. Chaumont recorded the album for the ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Karin Hammar With The Mathias Landaeus Trio At Underground

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Karin Hammar with the Mathias Landaeus Trio Underground Lund, Sweden April 25, 2018 Trombonist Karin Hammar blows her horn with authority--her technical control in all registers impresses without slipping into self-indulgence, and she has a pleasing, warm sound on the instrument. On her Wednesday night gig with the Mathias Landaeus trio, she occasionally augmented her sound with electronics, but these were more exercises in punctuation than a full-scale commitment along the lines of, say, Miles ...

JAZZ BASTARD

April 2018: Cécile McLorin Salvant, Binker and Moses, Yazz Ahmed.

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Episode 137 looks at recordings by Sophie Milman, Rene Marie, Monica Zetterlund, and Cécile McLorin Salvant. We discuss the jazz content in each release, the vocal approach of each singer, and the elusive concept of sultriness. Female jazz singers are often packaged and sold as sex objects. Some are more comfortable expressing their sensual sides than others. Where do you draw the line between self-expression and exploitation? What to make of singers like Salvant, who question the paradigm of the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Dafnis Prieto: Back to the Sunset

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Back to the Sunset, the new album by the Dafnis Prieto Big Band opens with “Una Vez Mas," a fairly traditional Latin big band workout. Don't let that fool you--this is not your padre's Latin jazz album. Half way through the decidedly more mysterioso second track, “The Sooner the Better," it's amply apparent that Prieto is willing to explore by-ways ignored by genre traditionalists. The result is a challenging album that requires attentive listening if its pleasures are to be ...

JAZZ BASTARD

March 2018: Louis Armstrong, Bunny Berrigan, and Henry “Red” Allen.

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Episode 135 takes a thorough and loving look at Louis Armstrong's 1930's recordings for the Decca company. After a couple years nursing a blown lip and searching for new musical contexts, Louis hooked up with manager Joe Glaser and soon had a contract with Decca records, which featured him on a kaleidoscope of recordings, from remakes of some Hot Fives triumphs to collaborations with the Mills Brothers to novelty numbers about Hawaii. The resulting four hours of music is surprisingly ...