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DVD/FILM REVIEWS

Rolling Stones: Voodoo Lounge Uncut

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Rolling Stones Voodoo Lounge Uncut Eagle Vision 2018 If there's anything better than issuing a previously-unreleased recording of some kind, it's putting out a fully-restored piece once available only in part. As indicated by its title, the Rolling Stones Voodoo Lounge Uncut represents the full and complete performance, in proper running order, from Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami. Prior to this DVD/2CD (or Blu-ray/2CD and limited vinyl) package, only portions of this November 1994 concert ...

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Lee Michaels: Dinosaurs Still Rule!

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Even if you came of age in the Seventies, you may still need to refresh your memory about how Lee Michaels made a name for himself. The memory lapse may very well be due to the fact that, as Michaels appeared in performance, it was (and still is) altogether startling to see him playing (usually a Hammond organ) with just one other musician, most conspicuously the drummer simply known as Frosty (who subsequently went on to be come a staple ...

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Seth Yacovone Band and Radio Underground: Rockin' the Green Mountains

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Teeming as it is with diversity on so many fronts, it is altogether surprising the Burlington Vermont music scene suffers from a distinct lack of rock and roll. Perhaps it's the self-consciously hip factor often afflicting the community, but the likes of the Seth Yacovone Band and Radio Underground exist as something approaching an endangered species (perpetual punks Rough Francis notwithstanding) --that is, if it weren't for the regular cycle of live performances and recordings offered by the principals in ...

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Scott Sharrard & Jack Pearson: Brothers by Proxy

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As the legacy of the Allman Brothers Band looms ever larger with the passing years, those musicians outside the nucleus of the seminal Southern rock/blues band are building upon their early contributions to the group, plus their own prior work, in so doing elevating their profiles proportionately. Take Jack Pearson, for instance, whose stint with ABB from 1997 to 1999 is often overshadowed by Derek Trucks who assumed the guitar position upon Pearson's departure (Jack also participated in the short-lived ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Son Volt: Okemah And The Melody Of Riot - Deluxe Edition

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Jay Farrar has hardly shown himself to be a self-promoter during the course of his career. Dating back to the alternative country band Uncle Tupelo through his ongoing solo efforts and intermittently leading the similarly-styled Son Volt, this taciturn man has preferred to make his statements almost solely through his music. An exception to his low profile mode was work on and publicizing of the 20th Anniversary Edition of the latter band's Trace (Rhino,2015). But the release of ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

John Scofield: Combo 66

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The dignified portraits of John Scofield on the front and back covers of Combo 66 are at once in keeping with the reference to his age in the album's name and at odds with the youthful vigor he and his bandmates exhibit in playing the music inside this subtly eye-catching package of all new material. No wonder there's no formal credit for production in the liner details. As on “Can't Dance," the musicianship no doubt flowed effortlessly and ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

John Hiatt: The Eclipse Sessions

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Since John Hiatt hit his artistic and commercial stride with Bring The Family (A&M, 1987), the most listenable and durable albums of his have been those recorded with a band like the one appearing there (eventually known as Little Village: Ry Cooder, Nick Lowe and Jim Keltner). Offering comparably uniform musicianship in proportionate support of this highly-regarded songwriter's most memorable material, the Goners (featuring guitarist extraordinaire Sonny Landreth) appeared on Slow Turning (A&M, 1988) as well as The Tiki Bar ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Tom Petty: An American Treasure

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In a direct, no nonsense gesture the subject of this anthology would no doubt appreciate, the earliest inclusions on the 4-CD anthology An American Treasure illustrate how Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers forged their own style of songwriting and playing from Bob Dylan, the Byrds and the Rolling Stones. “Surrender," “Listen To Her Heart," and" You're Gonna Get It" and, in one of the rare appearances in this set of a trademark tune in readily recognizable form, “Breakdown" also clarify ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

The Doors: Waiting For The Sun 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition

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Even though it was just a year after their resounding debut, The Doors (Elektra, 1967) and a followup of sizable, if slightly lesser magnitude, Strange Days (Elektra, 1967)--arguably the stronger of the first two records out only months apart the same year--the bloom was off the rose for the Doors by the time 1968 rolled around, creatively if not commercially. Indeed, much of the mystery within and around the Doors was gone by their third album Waiting For The Sun, ...

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Up From The Roots: Cary Morin, Colin James, Joanne Shaw Taylor & Chris Youlden

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Blues musicians invariably cover traditional genre material because it connects them with the wellspring of emotion at the heart of this music and illustrates the major influences on their personal style. Sometimes these gestures are more obvious than others, but as are those of Cary Morin's on his latest album, they can bespeak bold courage as much as humble homage. On occasion, as with Joanne Shaw-Taylor's on her fifth album, such obeisance only hints at the influences at work, while ...