Articles by Chris Mosey

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Erroll Garner: Octave Remastered Series

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In 1958 jazz pianist Erroll Garner became embroiled in a bitter legal battle with Columbia Records over money and the fact that the company had released an album of his early work against his wishes. He cancelled his contract with the company and started recording instead for his own label, Octave, making up on lost income by tours of Europe. During the last 18 years of his career Garner recorded a total of 12 albums for Octave. ...

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Petter Bergander Trio: Kierkegaard's Waltz

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The honouring in popular song of Sören Kierkegaard, author of “The Sickness Unto Death" and other light works has been a long time coming. To be exact, we've waited since his death in 1855 for this moment. “Heidegger's Boogie" and “The Schopenhauer Rag" must surely follow. The curious thing is that Kierkegaard's Waltz is an album of really quite soothing music which, on the face of it, would seem to bear little resemblance to the philosophical musings of the chap ...

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Vivian Buczek: A Woman's Voice

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An ambitious project from Sweden: vocalist Vivian Buczek joining forces with the Norrbotten Big Band using song to illustrate life from a woman's perspective. Buczek says: “It's about taking the step from a girl to a woman, looking back in time and then to the future, finding my place in the world and daring to go my own way." With this album she celebrates some of her main sources of inspiration, artists who have made a lasting ...

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Michel Camilo: Essence

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Michel Camilo is a virtuoso pianist who mixes jazz, Latin and classical. Playing as part of a trio, he is famous for hitting the listener with a constant barrage of technique as dazzling as it is tiring. Fortunately, the big band format of Essence puts the lid on such displays. The album forms a retrospective on Camilo's career. It opens with “And Sammy Walked In" from the maestro's 1989 album On Fire. It is dedicated to Sammy ...

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Ranky Tanky: Good Time

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Why change a winning formula? Ranky Tanky's follow-up to their hit debut album takes things further in the same vein: a heady mix of gospel and traditional Gullah songs from the Sea Islands of South Carolina, laced with original music and lyrics. The emphasis this time is on a pounding beat generated by the electric guitar of lone white man Clay Ross and the drumming of Quentin Baxter. Much of the music, especially “Pay Me My Money ...

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Soren Bebe: Echoes

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Danish pianist Søren Bebe plays a melancholy, minimalistic music almost shorn of rhythm. It is gentle and flowing and easy to get lost in. When one of his pieces ends, it can be like waking from a dream. “But is it jazz?" The jury is still out on that one and will be for some time to come. Bebe's music is certainly in the tradition of Esbjørn Svensson and Tord Gustavsen, who were eventually, albeit perhaps unwillingly, ...

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Duke Ellington: Uppsala 1971

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From his first visit in 1939 to a concert a few months before his death in 1973, Duke Ellington took special pleasure in visiting Sweden. He composed a “Serenade to Sweden" and wrote a new arrangement for a very Swedish pop song, “I en rod liten stuga (In a Red Little Cottage)." He also entered into a fruitful collaboration with Swedish vocalist Alice Babs. This album, recorded at a concert in the great hall of Uppsala University on ...

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Longineu Parsons: 25th Anniversary Work Song

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Longineu Parsons blows his trumpet with fearsome intensity on the first four tracks of this album celebrating the 25th anniversary of Nat Adderley's classic soul number “Work Song." Perhaps he blows it with enough intensity to wake the dead: Nat Adderley who died on January 2, 2000, is credited with production, while the great but largely unheralded Sam Rivers, who died on December 26, 2011, blows up a storm on reeds. The liner notes state: “It might ...

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Veronica Swift: Confessions

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Times change. In the Me Too era it is clearly politically incorrect for a female singer to sidle up to the microphone and huskily breathe “My Heart Belongs To Daddy" like Julie London used to do. Or even, for that matter, to lustily proclaim “Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend" like Marilyn Monroe. But a residue of that sort of thing (it's called sex appeal) needs to remain, regardless. Veronica Swift is the epitome of a modern female ...

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The Session: Collusion

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The Session are four very talented musicians from New Orleans with a good grasp of their place in jazz history. They play music from New Orleans. It's their own, not trad and it's extremely good. Unfortunately they also fancy themselves as political activists, crudely attacking the admittedly crude Trump administration. Hence the album title, Collusion and track titles “Bigly," and the awful “Kelly Ann Con Artist," which childishly seeks to lambast Trump's former political adviser, Kelly-Ann Conway. ...

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Jesse Palter: Paper Trail

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Carole King and her then husband Gerry Goffin once wrote a song titled “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?" It was condemned in some quarters as being likely to encourage promiscuity and this gave King and Goffin a certain cachet. The song was originally recorded in 1960 by the African American girl group The Shirelles and made No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It gradually lost all its notoriety and instead became a success story. ...

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Antonio Adolfo: Samba Jazz Alley

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With this album, Antonio Adolfo, an early exponent of bossa nova, takes a look at the roots of the music in his hometown, Rio de Janeiro. He recalls: “From 1958 to 1965 a small alley in the Copacabana district became known as Beco das Garrafas, Bottles Alley, because neighbours in taller buildings used to throw bottles down from their apartments in protest at the loud music and boisterous conversation coming from below. It was like a cauldron of jazz, samba ...


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