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Red Mitchell / Warne Marsh: Big Two

Read "Big Two" reviewed by Chris Mosey

In the 1950s, critics talked of East and West coast jazz. It was a way of playing the racial card, with East coast representing black, played from the gut; while West was white, played from the mind. As far as the dogmatists were concerned: East good, West bad. The word “cerebral" became a term of abuse. No group of musicians was more cerebral than the one centered around Lennie Tristano, a pianist and teacher, based awkwardly in ...

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Red Mitchell / George Cables: Live at Port Townsend

Read "Live at Port Townsend" reviewed by Ken Dryden

Piano/bass duos are not as commonplace as piano/bass/drums trios, probably because duos rarely make up a regularly working group. That doesn't mean that the frequently one-off recordings by duos aren't of immense interest. The remarkable duo concert featuring bassist Red Mitchell and pianist George Cables (who had never played together) turned out to be Mitchell's final recording, made only a few months prior to his death in 1992. No rehearsal took place, aside from a brief discussion ...

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Red Mitchell: A Declaration of Interdependence

Read "A Declaration of Interdependence" reviewed by Jack Bowers

An out–of–the–ordinary 1988 session by the “Red Mitchell Trio,” which, courtesy of modern technology, is composed of Red Mitchell on bass, Red Mitchell on piano and Red Mitchell on vocals. The “leader,” of course, was known primarily as a bassist (the past tense is used because he passed away in November ’92), but his “sidemen” are respectable enough, especially pianist Mitchell who has an uncluttered, easygoing style and sensitive touch that lend themselves well to the trio format. On the ...


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