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Worktime, One Step Beyond and Questions

Read "Worktime, One Step Beyond and Questions" reviewed by Marc Cohn

Charenee Wade starts us off offering wisdom, followed by questions posed by Jimmy Raney, Danny Grissett, Kenny Werner, John Ellis & Tal Farlow. Then, a major Sonny Rollins celebration with tracks from his monumental Worktime recording. We've also got a Jazz Times 'Top 50 of all time' alto sax session from Jackie McLean. More? Of course: Cassandra Wilson & The Fat Babies (doing Hoagy Carmichael), Brad Mehldau, J.J. Johnson & Ferenc Snétberger. Do enjoy the show! Thanks to ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jackie McLean: New Soil

Read "New Soil" reviewed by Greg Simmons

Jackie McLean's New Soil, is not the most acclaimed album in the classic Blue Note catalogue, but this 1959 release deserves more attention that it gets, being supremely well-played, well-written and--within the limitations of its time--well-recorded. This vinyl reissue, remastered from the original tapes by the good folks at Acous-Tech, is part of a series of albums--fifty titles in all, so far--that includes some of the most well-known Blue Note recordings from the 1950s and '60s, and may well represent ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Jackie McLean: 4, 5 and 6 (RVG) & New Wine in Old Bottles

Read "Jackie McLean: 4, 5 and 6 (RVG) & New Wine in Old Bottles" reviewed by Graham L. Flanagan

Jackie McLean 4, 5 and 6 (RVG) Prestige-Concord 2007 Jackie McLean New Wine In Old Bottles East Wind-Test of Time 2007

Although the late Jackie McLean might be best remembered for his more adventurous, improv-based recordings such as Destination Out!, Right Now!, Vertigo, etc., he made a major mark in the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jackie McLean: 4, 5 and 6

Read "4, 5 and 6" reviewed by James Taylor

Not to discredit the ability, output or creative drive of any musician who has contributed to the pantheon of documented jazz in the past fifty years, but there are definitely tiers of jazz players, at least with regards to who receives credit and recognition in the eyes of the lay jazz fan. Your first tier is your Miles Davis', John Coltrane's and Thelonious Monk's (the sort of guys who go by one name only, if you will). If you're new ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jackie McLean: 4, 5 & 6

Read "4, 5 & 6" reviewed by John Barron

When you listen to Jackie McLean on 4, 5 & 6, his third releae as a leader, you hear a young, passionate, hungry artist in search of a musical identity. The influence of Charlie Parker on his sound is obvious. The seemingly indelible marks left by Bird are present throughout all of McLean's '50s sessions for Prestige.

4, 5, & 6 is a strong outing for the legendary alto saxophonist and his swinging rhythm section of pianist Mal Waldron, bassist ...

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Jackie McLean: Demon's Dance

Read "Demon's Dance" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

Sometimes a work of art is best known because it ends a period in its creator's career. If, in addition to its historic importance, it has immense artistic value, then it becomes a masterpiece. Such is the case of Demon's Dance, the last recording from Jackie McLean's Blue Note period, during which he discovered his unique voice both as a composer and as a performer over the span of 21 albums.

The essence of all those records is distilled and ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Jackie McLean: It's Time; Consequence

Read "Jackie McLean: It's Time; Consequence" reviewed by Francis Lo Kee

Jackie McLean It's Time Blue Note 2006 Jackie McLean Consequence Blue Note 2006

Jackie McLean, one of jazz' most painful losses this past year, had an unmistakable sound: a slightly-sharp-of-center intonation, percussive phrasing and a boundless, thoughtful energy to lift you up out of any depressive state. These are two CDs ...

PROFILES

Jackie McLean: Destination Out

Read "Jackie McLean: Destination Out" reviewed by Clifford Allen

Plagued as we are by historicism, it is not always easy to really hear the music of Charlie Parker as it was played in the clubs or even in studio rehearsals. In some ways, the importance of the artist is more through students and followers than in the firsthand practice of that artist: painter Hans Hofmann is more greatly felt through Willem de Kooning and Joan Mitchell, and so the lineage and importance of Bird is felt in Jackie McLean, ...

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Jackie McLean: The Jackie Mac Attack Live

Read "The Jackie Mac Attack Live" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Last year, with no fanfare whatsoever, this outstanding recording was reissued by Birdology, the reissue arm of Dreyfus Records. It features one of the greatest alto saxophonists in jazz history, in a 1991 club performance, going for broke, and in the process, making an album for the ages.

McLean starts the proceedings off with a bang, spitting out the riff to “Cyclical," an up-tempo minor blues. He then proceeds to carve out a stunning, in- your-face improvisation, with all his ...

INTERVIEWS

Classic Jackie McLean

Read "Classic Jackie McLean" reviewed by WBGO 88.3FM

Alto saxophonist Jackie McLean has maintained a prolific career as a performer and composer that has spanned four decades. Here he talks about his latest Blue Note release Fire and Love, career experiences and his steadfast work as a music educator.

Gary Walker: On your latest recording Fire and Love are your son René McLean on tenor, Raymond Williams on trumpet, Steve Davis on trombone, Alan Jay Palmer on piano, and drummer Eric McPherson — all under our ...

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Jackie McLean: Jackie's Bag

Read "Jackie's Bag" reviewed by Hank Shteamer

Alto saxophonist Jackie McLean's Jackie's Bag is an enjoyable, if not terribly unique, manifestation of vintage Blue Note hard bop: hard-swinging, impeccably performed and recorded in gorgeous, crisp stereo by Rudy Van Gelder. The material on Jackie's Bag comes from two different sessions, each with a different supporting cast (Jan. ‘59, with Donald Byrd on trumpet, Sonny Clark on piano, Paul Chambers on bass, and Philly Joe Jones on drums; and Sept. ‘60, with Blue Mitchell on ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jackie McLean: Jacknife

Read "Jacknife" reviewed by Robert Gilbert

In a string of Blue Note albums during the 1960s, alto saxophonist Jackie McLean documented his efforts to incorporate elements of the Avant-garde with his own brand of mainstream jazz. Starting with Let Freedom Ring, McLean embraced modality and wasn’t sheepish to use honks and squeaks in his solos. This 1965 session, newly reissued as part of Blue Note’s Connoisseur series, showcases McLean’s exciting vision of jazz in all its glory.

With a rhythm section of Larry Willis, Larry Ridley ...


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