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BAILEY'S BUNDLES

Ten Men

Read "Ten Men" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

My unscientific estimate contends that there are three female vocalists for every male vocalist. This does not mean that there are no male vocalists out there as evidenced by these ten examples. They just take a little longer to accumulate. Jay Leonhart and Tomoko Ohno Don't You Wish Chancellor Music 2017 Jay Leonhart is a known entity. He is a well-known bassist and singer, and as he proves on Don't You Wish ...

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Jay Leonhart: Don't You Wish

Read "Don't You Wish" reviewed by Dr. Judith Schlesinger

After experimenting with other instruments, a phase described in the title track, “Don't You Wish," Jay Leonhart locked onto the bass at the age of 13. Later inspired and mentored by the legendary Ray Brown, he began his stellar career which included playing with icons Duke Ellington, Judy Garland, Buddy Rich, Sarah Vaughan, Mel Torme, and Tony Bennett. Leonhart has also anchored well-known trios and led his own, honing his solid reputation as an exceptionally gifted and versatile musician.

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Jay Leonhart: Don't You Wish?

Read "Don't You Wish?" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

Jay Leonhart has been active as a jazz bassist from the 1960s, and since 1983's Salamander Pie (Digital Music Productions, 1990), he has, from time to time, headlined records as that rara avis, the singer-songwriter who plays acoustic bass rather than acoustic guitar. (one example: “Goodbye, Miami" from the debut--it sounds more prescient day by day.) Leonhart is an accomplished, fluid bassist who's appeared on gigs and records with a host of top-notch musicians. On Don't You Wish? ...

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Ben Aronov, Jay Leonhart: Alone Together

Read "Alone Together" reviewed by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

There's something to be said about the sureness with which Ben Aronov and Jay Leonhart play as a duo. A recording they did in the studio in the '80s was pushed back for years, finally released as Alone Together. The title could not be more fitting. The album stands as a work of syncretism; Aronov was an established jazzman before he met and befriended Jay Leonhart and, by then, Leonhart had made a name for himself in the jazz community. ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Jay Leonhart Trio: Cool

Read "Jay Leonhart Trio: Cool" reviewed by Gabriel Medina Arenas

Jay Leonhart Trio Cool Sons of Sound 2004

Leonhart says that the music from his new album Cool gets hot, and he's right. It has music taken from films, musical plays and jazz classics. The experienced bassist, who started in music at seven playing banjo and guitar, is a real entertainer and shows us the amiable and comical face of jazz. From the beginning this Cd produces on listeners an involuntary movement of head ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Jay Leonhart & John Sheridan: Trios

Read "Jay Leonhart & John Sheridan: Trios" reviewed by Brian P. Lonergan

Jay Leonhart Trio Cool Sons of Sound 2004

In the liner notes to his new trio album, Cool , bassist Jay Leonhart writes, “I'm afraid 'Cool' isn't nearly as laid back as the title might imply," and he's right. Rather than the style of jazz, the name refers to the Bernstein/Sondheim song from West Side Story , which is just one of the appealing tracks on an album awash in colorful arrangements.

Leonhart's trio, ...

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Jay Leonhart: Cool

Read "Cool" reviewed by Dr. Judith Schlesinger

This CD isn't “cool" in the sense of inscrutable players wearing dark shades and attitude. It's more like the “cool" applied to something delightful, like this trio's deft and friendly handling of the material. The jazz on Cool is absolutely solid but never dense--it's playful and flowing, full of imagination and wit.

The trio freshens the familiar with new arrangements. They dare to commit reharmonization on “C Jam Blues," and it works; so does the rubato bass lead ...

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Jay Leonhart Trio: Fly Me to the Moon: Tribute to Ray Brown

Read "Fly Me to the Moon: Tribute to Ray Brown" reviewed by J. Robert Bragonier

I am an avowed sucker when it comes to Ray Brown; mention of his name is guaranteed to raise my eyebrows and catch my attention. When, in addition, I see names like Benny Green, Jay Leonhart, and Al Cohn's son Joe in association with a tribute to the master bassist, I'm pretty well on the way to being hooked, before I've heard a note. Such was the case when this CD arrived, and it's just as well; if I had ...

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Jay Leonhart: Rodgers and Leonhart

Read "Rodgers and Leonhart" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

This quirky little recording offers a freshly-performed collection of Richard Rodgers compositions presented in a springtime nouvelle façon. Bassist/vocalist Leonhart provides this recording with a beautifully fresh sense of humor and novel invention.

Multiple vocalists ply their respective wares on these Broadway gems. Notable tunes from the list of usual suspects include two from The Sound of Music. The show title and “Edelweiss" represent worthy additions to the American Canon. These performances on the whole have a ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jay Leonhart: Galaxies and Planets

Read "Galaxies and Planets" reviewed by Dave Nathan

Master bassist Jay Leonhart has chosen a program of his own songs to fill an album dedicated to the memory of Milt Hinton. The material is the type one associates with Murk Murphy, Dave Frishberg and Bob Dorough, hip, often funny and kind of folksy. It's as if Leonhart was sitting across from you recounting some of his life events. Nothing very heavy, things like trying to get his bass on a plane “Bass Aboard a Plane" or being held ...


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