Articles | Popular | Future

RADIO

Vocalese (1952 - 1961)

Read "Vocalese (1952 - 1961)" reviewed by Russell Perry

Arising out of bebop vocals, a number of singers in the 1950s began to replicate famous instrumental solos with the human voice. The practice, initiated by Eddie Jefferson, King Pleasure and Annie Ross was known as vocalese and reached its peak in the extraordinary recordings of Lambert, Hendricks & Ross. Playlist Host Intro 0:00 King Pleasure Nonet. “Moody's Mood for Love (aka I'm in the Mood for Love)" from Jumpin' & Jivin' (Specialty) 2:43 King Pleasure Quartet. “Parker's ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross: Sing A Song of Basie

Read "Sing A Song of Basie" reviewed by David Rickert

Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross are pioneers of a unique singing style called vocalese, which involves replacing instrumental jazz with sung lines and invented lyrics. The method was first used by artists such as King Pleasure, who with a rhythm section backing him added lyrics to a Charlie Parker solo in a version that Parker hated. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross took it to the logical next step, which was to duplicate an entire instrumental arrangement for voices; in this case, Count ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross: Sing A Song of Basie

Read "Sing A Song of Basie" reviewed by David Rickert

Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross are pioneers of a unique singing style called vocalese, which involves replacing instrumental jazz with sung lines and invented lyrics. The method was first used by artists such as King Pleasure, who with a rhythm section backing him added lyrics to a Charlie Parker solo in a version that Parker hated. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross took it to the logical next step, which was to duplicate an entire instrumental arrangement for voices; in this case, Count ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Lambert, Hendricks & Bavan: Lambert, Hendricks & Bavan at Newport '63

Read "Lambert, Hendricks & Bavan at Newport '63" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

When it comes to the classic art of vocalese (i.e. putting words to instrumental solos), no group or individual has really come close to reaching the pinnacle obtained by the group Lambert, Hendricks, & Ross during the late '50s and early '60s. Their versions of “Cookin' at the Continental", “Cloudburst", and “Twisted", too name just a few, are still considered the quintessential examples of this art form. Unfortunately for Dave Lambert and Jon Hendricks, Annie Ross didn't stick around long, ...


Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.