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RADIO

Big Ten Inch Record

Read "Big Ten Inch Record" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

As the great Sigmund Freud said, sometimes an EP is just an EP. In this case, actually, it's six EP's, as the boys look at that chimera of the early LP era, the ten-inch long-playing record, focusing on releases from the early to mid-nineteen fifties on Blue Note and Fantasy, along with a Resonance Records' Record Store Day release of archival guitar music recorded in mid-fifties Indianapolis but not released until the twenty-first century. Much musing about the special flavor ...

RADIO

Jazz & Soundtracks

Read "Jazz & Soundtracks" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu

Jazz has had a very close relationship with cinema and TV. To be perfectly frank in this relationship cinema and TV have not as generous as jazz has been towards cinema. Jazz has been only sporadically covered by quality movies. When that has happened the quantity of stereotypies and clichés about jazz spoiled them for any serious fun. Nevertheless, jazz musicians have made great contributions to soundtracks (from Duke Ellington's music for Otto Preminger's “Anatomy ...

INTERVIEWS

J.J. Johnson: An Eminent Life in Music

Read "J.J. Johnson: An Eminent Life in Music" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

This interview with trombonist J.J. Johnson along with Joshua Berrett and Louis G. Bourgois III, authors of his biography, The Musical World of J.J. Johnson (Scarecrow Press) was first published at All About Jazz in November 1999. All About Jazz: Congratulations to Josh and Louis on your new book--and to J.J. for now having a scholarly reference devoted to your outstanding contributions to music. Just for the fun of it, which three recordings and/or scores would you take ...

MY BLUE NOTE OBSESSION

J.J. Johnson: The Eminent Jay Jay Johnson, Volumes 1 and 2 – Blue Note 1505 and 1506

Read "J.J. Johnson: The Eminent Jay Jay Johnson, Volumes 1 and 2 – Blue Note 1505 and 1506" reviewed by Marc Davis

Think of jazz, and the trombone almost never comes to mind. Didn't used to be. In the beginning, every jazz band had a trombone. But that was the Dixieland era, and Dixieland bands aren't much in vogue anymore. (Unless you're a fan of HBO's Treme and you listen to Trombone Shorty. Sadly, not enough people do, or Treme would still be on the air.) Then came the big band era, and suddenly lots of trombones were ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

J.J. Johnson & Kai Winding Quintet: Complete Fifties Studio Recordings

Read "Complete Fifties Studio Recordings" reviewed by Francis Lo Kee

The first thing that piqued my interest about Complete Fifties Studio Recordings (compiled from the Savoy, Prestige, Columbia, and Bethlehem labels) was the inclusion of a rare Mingus piece called “Reflections. When you get to track number six after traveling through the preceding tunes (including the delightful “Bernie's Tune ) you might utter “Toto, I don't think we're in Kansas anymore.

The piece starts off with the lowest “F on arco bass, and then the first trombone plays a slightly ...

BOOK REVIEWS

The Musical World Of J.J. Johnson

Read "The Musical World Of J.J. Johnson" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

The Musical World Of J.J. Johnson Joshua Berrett and Louis G. Bourgois III Scarecrow Press, Inc. ISBN 0810836483 1999 J.J. Johnson is known to the listening public as a jazz trombonist who has repeatedly won the Downbeat and many other polls, who has played the instrument at super-rapid clips (a jny: Philadelphia nightclub once billed him, Barnum and Bailey style, as “The Fastest Trombone Player Alive!"), and who, with the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

J.J. Johnson: The J.J. Johnson Memorial Album

Read "The J.J. Johnson Memorial Album" reviewed by Norman Weinstein

Is it possible to think of jazz trombone without the artistry of J.J. Johnson coming to mind? His death in 2001 brought closure to a career covering a half-century, and there are few major figures in bop/ mainstream jazz that didn't share concert billing with him. His recorded output graced a number of labels: Blue Note, Prestige, Concord, and Verve. In a perfect world, a career retrospective would be a multi-disc, multi-label affair. In this imperfect world, thank Fantasy Jazz ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

J.J. Johnson: The Eminent J.J. Johnson Vol. 1

Read "The Eminent J.J. Johnson Vol. 1" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Compared with the first appearance of previously released jazz albums in CD format, the second generation of jazz CD reissues represents sophisticated product: 24 bit remastering, updated liner notes, and glossy packaging--candy for jazz lovers. One in the most recent block of titles from Blue Note’s Rudy Van Gelder (RVG) edition reissue series, The Eminent J.J. Johnson, Volume One plays a variation on the reissue theme. Blue Note originally issued the songs on this session piecemeal as two separate albums. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

J. J. Johnson: Pinnacles

Read "Pinnacles" reviewed by AAJ Staff

From the start of a decade, this tried to blend old faces with a new sound. The electric piano starts up; the sound flits from speaker to speaker in annoying fashion. The rhythm gets behind, Billy Higgins getting a firm hand on things. And then J.J. enters: dark and rich and full of confidence. He stutters his solo with short tight trumpet notes, then goes rumply with some guttural clusters. Tommy Flanagan goes quiet and cool, his electric stating the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

J. J. Johnson and Ray Anderson: Heroes and Funkorific

Read "Heroes and Funkorific" reviewed by John Sharpe

Many years ago, I played the trombone in my high-school band. Personally, I found it to be a rather awkward, unwieldy instrument. These two discs demonstrate that, in the hands of master musicians, the old 'bone is capable of great range and expressive versatility. Heroes and Funkorific are a study in contrasts between the legendary veteran Johnson and Anderson, the “young lion." J.J. Johnson is rightly credited with adapting bebop to the trombone. His warm tone has changed little over ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

J.J. Johnson: Heroes

Read "Heroes" reviewed by Jim Santella

Still paving the way for younger trombone-playing leaders and composers, J.J. Johnson at 75 plays that instrument better than any other jazz artist does. Remember Kid Ory, Jack Teagarden, Vic Dickenson, Glenn Miller, and Tommy Dorsey? Don’t forget Frank Rosolino. And there’s Urbie Green, John Fedchock, Steve Turre, Wycliffe Gordon, Robin Eubanks, and Ray Anderson. Lots more names too, but the list is nothing compared to the large numbers of trumpeters and tenor saxophone players who’ve led bands and whose ...


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