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INTERVIEWS

Remembering Milt Jackson

Read "Remembering Milt Jackson" reviewed by Lazaro Vega

This interview was first published at All About Jazz in November 1999 and is part of our ongoing effort to archive pre-database material. This interview was conducted prior to a Modern Jazz Quartet performance at Hope College, Holland, Michigan in September of 1989. Broadcast at the time on Blue Lake Public Radio; portions of this interview appeared in an advance article published by the Grand Rapids Press. Jackson spoke from his home in Teaneck, N.J. Lazaro ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: Sunflower / Goodbye

Read "Sunflower / Goodbye" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

Even if vibes player Milt Jackson had just played with The Modern Jazz Quartet and not embarked on a solo career, his place in jazz history would be secure. However, Jackson was much more than a vital part of the famous chamber jazz group and he recorded a string of excellent albums, including three sessions as a leader for Creed Taylor's label, CTI. Two of those albums are now conveniently gathered in a single-disc package from British ...

MY BLUE NOTE OBSESSION

Milt Jackson and the Thelonious Monk Quintet

Read "Milt Jackson and the Thelonious Monk Quintet" reviewed by Marc Davis

And now, a crossroads: At what price do I pass? It's the dilemma all collectors face eventually. At first, you buy the commons. A used CD at $4 is a no-brainer. A new CD at $10 or $12, easy to justify. But what do you do when the easies are gone and the price makes you think twice? I've reached that point. My mission is to collect all the Blue Note CDs in the classic 1500 ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: Sunflower

Read "Sunflower" reviewed by John Kelman

With a series of mainstream dates to his credit dating back to the early 1950s—not to mention charter membership in the now-legendary Modern Jazz Quartet (MJQ) and one-offs with everyone from bop saxophonist Charlie Parker to “new thing" saxophonist John Coltrane—vibraphonist Milt Jackson was the clear link between his instrument's swing era beginnings with Lionel Hampton and more progressive things to come with then-relative youngsters Gary Burton and Bobby Hutcherson. Still—and despite the label's centrist-leaning proclivities on one hand, balancing ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: Da Capo

Read "Da Capo" reviewed by Nic Jones

Milt Jackson was to the vibraphone what Bud Powell was to the piano, in terms of how he disseminated the expansive harmonic vocabulary of bebop. This set, featuring both his early small group work and a fledgling Modern Jazz Quartet, indicates just how expansive his music was in the first decades of his career.

“Baggy Eyes" and “Autumn Breeze (In A Beautiful Mood)" are the earliest tracks on offer here, dating from April of 1948. They catch Jackson at a ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: Things are Getting Better; Bags Meets Wes

Read "Milt Jackson: Things are Getting Better; Bags Meets Wes" reviewed by Donald Elfman

Milt “Bags Jackson gained international notoriety as the vibraphonist and co-leader of the Modern Jazz Quartet, in which setting his rich and warm sense of the blues, his solid swing and his mastery of technique on his instrument provided a somewhat more animated complement to the slightly more delicate and ethereal playing of pianist John Lewis (though it must be said that Lewis could swing and dig into the blues with the best of them!). These qualities enabled Jackson to ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson/Wes Montgomery: Bags Meets Wes

Read "Bags Meets Wes" reviewed by David Rickert

It’s unfair to blame Wes Montgomery for the soulless work of those who claim him as an influence; his trademark octave runs became a cash cow for the smooth jazz associated with the piped-in music of doctor’s offices and grocery stores. In reality, Montgomery was a much sought-after player by many; even Coltrane played with him for a time. Montgomery gives the impression that playing the guitar requires no less concentration than tying your shoes, fashioning a style admired (and ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: Soul Route

Read "Soul Route" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Two late great bluesmen.

Soul Route is a funky little confederation that brings together perhaps the two most sensitive blues sensibilities in jazz on a single recording— the late Milt Jackson and the late Gene Harris. Recorded during the former's productive ten-year association with Norman Granz and Pablo Records, Soul Route may be credited with sparking the reemergence of Idaho pianist Harris, who had spent a number of years in retirement following his long and successful leadership of The Three ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: Wizard of the Vibes

Read "Wizard of the Vibes" reviewed by AAJ Staff

The pairing of the Modern Jazz Quartet and Blue Note Records seems somehow incongruent. Blue Note was the home of hard bop--blues- and gospel-influenced, down to earth and funky. The MJQ navigated the Third Stream--sophisticated, refined, classically oriented and formal. They even performed in tuxedoes.

But there was a hefty dose of blues to the MJQ's Bach, most of it courtesy of vibraphonist Milt Jackson. Jackson's masterful blues-oriented improvisations are on fine display here on his only Blue Note outing. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: Sunflower

Read "Sunflower" reviewed by Douglas Payne

After years on the road with the Modern Jazz Quartet and a series of sterling solo and all-star jazz performances, vibraphonist Milt Jackson decided it was time to see some green. Watching kids half his age, possessing half his talent, earn millions playing rock, he insisted he could earn more without the restraints of the MJQ. He sought out Creed Taylor in 1972 and Sunflower became his first (and best) of three CTI albums. The album is significant ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson: In A New Setting

Read "In A New Setting" reviewed by Douglas Payne

For someone like Milt Jackson to declare this a new setting is really saying something. After all, the ageless vibraphonist has recorded in countless small groups capable of any style as well as in big bands, with strings, as a vocalist and as a guitarist too. What's new in this recently reissued 1964 quintet session is the surprising - and surprisingly complimentary - addition of pianist McCoy Tyner (who recorded A Love Supreme the same month).The rest of the group ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Milt Jackson meets the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra: Explosive!

Read "Explosive!" reviewed by Jim Santella

Vibraphonist Milt Jackson, 76, formed the roots of the Modern Jazz Quartet almost fifty years ago. That same lyrical quality that drives the MJQ stands before the fourteen-year-old Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, sharing, blending, and coaxing the melodies out of his vibraphone’s metal bars. The microphones are set up so that the listener has the same opportunity as one who is seated front and center, about seven rows back; piano and drums are on the left, while most of the horns ...


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