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Dave Glasser: Evolution

Read "Evolution" reviewed by Woodrow Wilkins

There's nothing wrong with a little old school. Saxophonist Dave Glasser keeps it simple--no flash, no gimmicks. Glasser has spent many years as a sideman, performing with artists including the Clark Terry Quintet, the Count Basie Orchestra, Illinois Jacquet and the Dizzy Gillespie All Stars. He has also recorded several CDs as a leader. A native of New York City, Glasser is a master saxophonist, having studied under Lee Konitz, Frank Perowsky and Barry Harris.

Drawing on his admiration for ...

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Dave Glasser: Evolution

Read "Evolution" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Alto saxophonist Dave Glasser might have been born at the wrong time. While he is performing and recording some terrific music in the 21st century, his stylistic preferences lean heavily on the music of the 1940s and '50s. Glasser spent ample time over the past two-plus decades performing with Clark Terry, Illinois Jacquet, and Barry Harris, learning about this music from the men who were there. While he continues to use this knowledge on the bandstand, he also pays it ...

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Dave Glasser: Above The Clouds

Read "Above The Clouds" reviewed by Mike Neely

Alto saxophonist Dave Glasser may not be widely known in the world of jazz, but that will change in time. Above the Clouds provides all the evidence one would need to acknowledge that an important new voice is on the scene. This release is a quartet recording with a solid lineup of musicians, featuring Glasser on alto playing a half dozen of his original compositions.Glasser is an intelligent soloist with a wide range of resources. His solo work ...

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Dave Glasser: Above The Clouds

Read "Above The Clouds" reviewed by Budd Kopman

Nat Hentoff, in his liner notes to Above The Clouds, doth protest too much in his discussion of jazz, with its supposed death in the States and its creative future in Europe, and then tying his categoric “No!" to icons such as Clark Terry and Jimmy Heath, and youngsters such as 13-year-old Grace Kelly. Wherever one's taste falls in the many streams of jazz, one should always acknowledge players who, while not being bleeding edge anything, have ...

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Dave Glasser: Above The Clouds

Read "Above The Clouds" reviewed by Michael P. Gladstone

Altoist Dave Glasser continues to build his reputation with Above the Clouds, a well-realized album that's equally divided between Glasser originals and visits to the Great American Songbook. Glasser's group includes pianist Larry Ham and the veteran rhythm section of bassist Dennis Irwin and drummer Carl Allen.

I had the pleasure of hearing Glasser (along with Larry Ham) on an early 2006 Arbors album, Swinging The Blues, which was led by bassist Earl May. There, Glasser delivered most of the ...

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Dave Glasser: Above The Clouds

Read "Above The Clouds" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Dave Glasser blows a sweet-sounding alto saxophone, and he swings hard and gets down into the blues on this quartet recording, which brings past alto masters Johnny Hodges and Benny Carter to mind. It's in the beautifully lyrical story telling of an alto horn in front of a fluid, subtle rhythm team.Glasser has played lead alto in Illinois Jacquet's big band and with the Count Basie Orchestra led by Frank Foster; he's also performed with a bunch of ...

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Dave Glasser: Dreams Askew, Dreams Anew

Read "Dreams Askew, Dreams Anew" reviewed by Dave Nathan

This is Dave Glasser's first album for the Artemis label. Previously, he was part of the Nagel Heyer stable having made two albums for them as a leader and numerous ones as a sideman. Of the young alto sax players on the scene today, few can match the purity of tone that Glasser gets out of the horn. It combines the sultry sound of Johnny Hodges with Stan Getz's out and out beautiful tone. Add to this a shred of ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

David Glasser/Clark Terry/Barry Harris Project: Uh! Oh!

Read "Uh! Oh!" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Uh! Oh! joins Wycliffe Gordon's Slidin' Home (N-H 2001) and Byron Stripling's StriplingNow! as the third in the Nagel-Heyer 2000 series of contemporary mainstream jazz. Known principally for documenting the traditional mainstream of Louis Armstrong, the Hamburg-based Nagel-Heyer spreads its considerable wings with this series. Uh! Oh! is the most fully realized contemporary offering to date from the label, showcasing the considerable composition talents of altoist Dave Glasser. Adding old timers Clark Terry and Barry Harris elevate these sides into ...