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Erroll Garner: Octave Remastered Series

Read "Octave Remastered Series" reviewed by Chris Mosey

In 1958 jazz pianist Erroll Garner became embroiled in a bitter legal battle with Columbia Records over money and the fact that the company had released an album of his early work against his wishes. He cancelled his contract with the company and started recording instead for his own label, Octave, making up on lost income by tours of Europe. During the last 18 years of his career Garner recorded a total of 12 albums for Octave. ...

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Erroll Garner: Nightconcert

Read "Nightconcert" reviewed by Peter Hoetjes

The lights dimmed, a spotlight illuminated the stage, and on Saturday November 7, 1964, Erroll Garner, wearing a black tuxedo and almost certainly one of his frequent grins, walked on stage to play piano to an audience of over 2,000 people at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam. The excitement was palpable, and the crowd roared and clapped with every deft turn he made. Garner didn't read music on a sheet, he never learned. He read his audience. When they were with ...

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Erroll Garner: Night Concert

Read "Night Concert" reviewed by Chris Mosey

It's the jazz equivalent of finding a Van Gogh or a Ming vase in the attic: the discovery of a complete, perfectly-recorded 1964 concert by one of the music's greatest virtuoso solo pianists. In the beginning was Art Tatum. Then came Oscar Peterson. Finally--and in many ways the most interesting of the holy trinity--Erroll Garner. Garner was famed for his long, rambling introductions. In a section of the liner notes jazz historian Professor Robin D. G. Kelley ...

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Erroll Garner: Nightconcert

Read "Nightconcert" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Erroll Garner's exuberance and love for his instrument, his music, his players, and his audience breaks today's poisoned and polarized air from the very first note of “Where or When" from Nightconcert, the archival release from the Erroll Garner Project, released on Mack Avenue Records. Recorded with a visceral intimacy and immediacy on November 7, 1964 at the fabled Royal Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Nightconcert is peak Garner, pure and simple, no holds barred. Featuring Garner and his classic ...

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Erroll Garner: Night Concert

Read "Night Concert" reviewed by Chris Mosey

It's the jazz equivalent of finding a Van Gogh or a Ming vase in the attic: the discovery of a complete 1964 perfectly recorded concert by one of the music's greatest virtuoso solo pianists. In the beginning was Art Tatum. Then came Oscar Peterson. Finally--and in many ways the most interesting of the holy trinity--was Erroll Garner. Garner was flashy, famed for his long, rambling introductions. In a section of the liner notes jazz historian Professor Robin ...

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Erroll Garner: Ready Take One

Read "Ready Take One" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Erroll Garner (1923-1977) played the piano like all was well with the world, with a flashy and elegant panache. And sometimes that's just what we need. With a swinging style that bubbled up from the stride and ragtime traditions, and nudged into the bop arena, Garner's was an ebullient sound--virtuosic and embellished with ornamental phrasings and splashes of sparkling colors. So, discovery of new Garner music, of the highest quality, is reason to celebrate. Ready Take ...

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Erroll Garner: Erroll Garner: The Complete Concert By the Sea

Read "Erroll Garner: The Complete Concert By the Sea" reviewed by David Rickert

Erroll Garner's Concert by the Sea was a huge hit when it was released in 1956 and became one of the few jazz records that everyone seemed to own. One listen is all it takes to understand the wide appeal of this live date from the Sunset Center in Carmel, California. Garner, the happiest and most extroverted of pianists, works through a program of well-known standards with technical brilliance and dazzling wit in a tour-de-force of stride, boogie-woogie, ragtime, and ...

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Erroll Garner: Early In Paris

Read "Early In Paris" reviewed by Warren Allen

Erroll Garner was one of the savants of jazz who helped define the sound and style of his instrument without ever learning to read music. His brilliance rested in a unique ear, from which he developed a personal and indisputably beautiful approach to the piano that spun beautiful, romantic statements and spontaneous adventures from his own tunes and the songs of the American Songbook. It is telling, that in a modern jazz world dominated by virtuosi, Garner remains as unduplicated ...

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Erroll Garner: 1953

Read "1953" reviewed by Jeff Dayton-Johnson

Listening to an Erroll Garner record is, for me, a little like the first time I drank mezcal, a distilled liquor made from the agave plant--with a worm in the bottle--in Oaxaca, Mexico. An initial sharp and soaring euphoria, unique among the alcoholic beverages, immediately followed by an equally sharp, crushing headache accompanied by nausea. The whole vertiginous process of substance abuse telescoped into a very few minutes' time.

So it is with most of the tracks on 1953, a ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Erroll Garner: Concert By The Sea

Read "Erroll Garner: Concert By The Sea" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Erroll Garner Concert By The Sea Columbia 40589 1955

In the same way that the former St. Louis Cardinal/Atlanta Brave Terry Pendleton demonstrated that a fat man could play most-valuable-player in baseball, Erroll Garner showed that one did not have to be able to read a note of music to be influential as a jazz musician. Born in Pittsburgh, Garner moved to New York City and worked with Slam Stewart's Trio during the early ...

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The Erroll Garner Trio: The Greatest Garner

Read "The Greatest Garner" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

Erroll Garner imperturbably played more or less the same piano style throughout his career, blending jazz and pop with a bounce and grin. When he rocks a tempo hard, as on this version of “Confessin,’” he nearly sounds the second coming of Fats Waller, completely free from the bebop influence felt by many of Garner’s piano contemporaries.

These 1949–50 sessions coincided with Garner’s engagements at such famous Harlem showplaces as the Three Deuces, the Apollo Theatre, and ...


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