Articles

Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

ALBUM REVIEWS

Madeline Eastman + Randy Porter: A Quiet Thing

Read "A Quiet Thing" reviewed by Nicholas F. Mondello

Recently one of the sports channels delivered a segment about a deep sea diver who plummets into and ascends from ocean depths unaided by air tanks. He does it all on his own breath. In that documentary, the diver speaks about the peak life experience he encounters with each daredevil dive. The metaphors of adventure, heightened experience and certainly depth and breath, of course--are quite apropos applied to Madeline Eastman as A Quiet Thing is a terrific recording and an ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Madeline Eastman + Randy Porter: A Quiet Thing

Read "A Quiet Thing" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

When Bay Area vocalist Madeline Eastman released Bare: A Collection Of Ballads (Mad-Kat, 2001), it was a bit of a departure from her previous recorded work. By that point, she was a decade into a critically acclaimed recording career and she had established herself as an adventurous, risk-taking, creative artist with albums like Point Of Departure (Madkat, 1990), featuring trumpeter Tom Harrell, and Mad About Madeline! (Madkat, 1991), with pianist Cedar Walton, saxophonist Phil Woods and guest vocalist Mark Murphy. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Madeline Eastman + Randy Porter: A Quiet Thing: A Collection of Ballads

Read "A Quiet Thing: A Collection of Ballads" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

The beauty of vocalist Madeline Eastman is that she is an undaunted improviser who remains conservative in her improvising. In this context, the word conservative harbors no negative connotations. Eastman has an abiding respect for the melody that is reflected in her thoughtful interpretations of the fourteen ballads making up A Quiet Thing. The piano-voice format also reflects this careful conservative approach to the material. The repertoire for this recording is what is truly provocative. Reading the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Madeline Eastman: The Speed of Life

Read "The Speed of Life" reviewed by Michael P. Gladstone

My suggestion for the cover of jazz vocalist Madeline Eastman's next album is a shot of her poised to dive into an uncharted body of water. This is one lady who is not afraid to take chances with existing material and even from note to note. The San Francisco singer has recorded five albums for her own Mad-Kat label—and although I haven't heard all of them, I would venture an opinion that she hasn't lost a step since 1990.

ALBUM REVIEWS

Madeline Eastman: The Speed of Life

Read "The Speed of Life" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Have you ever been in a club, or sat listening to a live recording, when a tenor saxophonist blows a solo in the middle of a standard, and it stays pretty much faithful to the theme for a bit, then stretches out into some unexpected – beautifully so – variations of theme, while still hanging onto it? A small, gorgeous musical surprise that makes someone in the audience moan: “Oh!" And a beat latter he sighs: “yeah..." ...


ENGAGE!

Enter our contest giveaways

Contest Giveaways

Enter our contests with a single button click and win a chance at albums or concert tickets.

Contest Guidelines

Reader's Poll: Which cities worldwide are tops in presenting jazz? Let us know.

Top Jazz Cities Poll

Which cities worldwide are tops in presenting jazz? Let us know—select up to ten.

More Polls

Super search project underway

Publisher's Desk

Stay current on website improvements, new features, handy tips, and more.

MORE POSTS | YEAR IN REVIEW

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.